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Online Tallies and the Context of Politics: How Online Tallies Make Dominant Candidates Appear Competent in Contexts of Conflict

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Online Tallies and the Context of Politics: How Online Tallies Make Dominant Candidates Appear Competent in Contexts of Conflict. / Laustsen, Lasse; Petersen, Michael Bang.

I: American Journal of Political Science, Bind 64, Nr. 2, 2020, s. 240-255.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{776f70eb82514c8680a29d1012279f2e,
title = "Online Tallies and the Context of Politics: How Online Tallies Make Dominant Candidates Appear Competent in Contexts of Conflict",
abstract = "In this article, we extend the classical notion of online tallies to shed light on the psychology underlying the rapid emergence of dominant political leaders. Predicated on two population-based panel surveys with embedded experiments, we demonstrate that citizens (1) store extremely durable tallies of candidate personalities in their long-term memory and (2) retrieve different tallies depending on the context. In particular, we predict and demonstrate that when contexts become more conflict-ridden, candidate evaluations rapidly shift from being negatively to positively associated with online impressions of candidate dominance. Although the notion of online tallies was originally proposed as an explanation of why citizens are able to vote for candidates on the basis of policy agreement, we demonstrate how the existence of context-sensitive online tallies can favor dominant candidates, even if the candidate is otherwise unappealing or does not share policy views with citizens on key issues.",
keywords = "candidate evaluations, Candidate traits, Online Processing, Dominance, Conflict, Leadership, INFORMATION INTEGRATION-THEORY, 1ST IMPRESSIONS, LEADERSHIP, FACES, REPUBLICANS, CHARACTER, ATTITUDES, IDEOLOGY, ELECTION, WARMTH",
author = "Lasse Laustsen and Petersen, {Michael Bang}",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1111/ajps.12490",
language = "English",
volume = "64",
pages = "240--255",
journal = "American Journal of Political Science",
issn = "0092-5853",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Online Tallies and the Context of Politics: How Online Tallies Make Dominant Candidates Appear Competent in Contexts of Conflict

AU - Laustsen, Lasse

AU - Petersen, Michael Bang

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - In this article, we extend the classical notion of online tallies to shed light on the psychology underlying the rapid emergence of dominant political leaders. Predicated on two population-based panel surveys with embedded experiments, we demonstrate that citizens (1) store extremely durable tallies of candidate personalities in their long-term memory and (2) retrieve different tallies depending on the context. In particular, we predict and demonstrate that when contexts become more conflict-ridden, candidate evaluations rapidly shift from being negatively to positively associated with online impressions of candidate dominance. Although the notion of online tallies was originally proposed as an explanation of why citizens are able to vote for candidates on the basis of policy agreement, we demonstrate how the existence of context-sensitive online tallies can favor dominant candidates, even if the candidate is otherwise unappealing or does not share policy views with citizens on key issues.

AB - In this article, we extend the classical notion of online tallies to shed light on the psychology underlying the rapid emergence of dominant political leaders. Predicated on two population-based panel surveys with embedded experiments, we demonstrate that citizens (1) store extremely durable tallies of candidate personalities in their long-term memory and (2) retrieve different tallies depending on the context. In particular, we predict and demonstrate that when contexts become more conflict-ridden, candidate evaluations rapidly shift from being negatively to positively associated with online impressions of candidate dominance. Although the notion of online tallies was originally proposed as an explanation of why citizens are able to vote for candidates on the basis of policy agreement, we demonstrate how the existence of context-sensitive online tallies can favor dominant candidates, even if the candidate is otherwise unappealing or does not share policy views with citizens on key issues.

KW - candidate evaluations

KW - Candidate traits

KW - Online Processing

KW - Dominance

KW - Conflict

KW - Leadership

KW - INFORMATION INTEGRATION-THEORY

KW - 1ST IMPRESSIONS

KW - LEADERSHIP

KW - FACES

KW - REPUBLICANS

KW - CHARACTER

KW - ATTITUDES

KW - IDEOLOGY

KW - ELECTION

KW - WARMTH

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070720944&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ajps.12490

DO - 10.1111/ajps.12490

M3 - Journal article

VL - 64

SP - 240

EP - 255

JO - American Journal of Political Science

JF - American Journal of Political Science

SN - 0092-5853

IS - 2

ER -