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Northern emporia and maritime networks. Modelling past communication using archaeological network analysis

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Standard

Northern emporia and maritime networks. Modelling past communication using archaeological network analysis. / Sindbæk, Søren Michael.

Harbours and Maritime Networks as Complex Aadptive Systems. red. / J. Preiser-Kapeller; F. Daim. Bind 23 Mainz : Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums, 2015. s. 105-118 (RGZM - Tagungen, Bind 23).

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

Harvard

Sindbæk, SM 2015, Northern emporia and maritime networks. Modelling past communication using archaeological network analysis. i J Preiser-Kapeller & F Daim (red), Harbours and Maritime Networks as Complex Aadptive Systems. bind 23, Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums, Mainz, RGZM - Tagungen, bind 23, s. 105-118, Harbours and maritime networks as complex adaptive systems, Mainz, Tyskland, 17/10/2013.

APA

Sindbæk, S. M. (2015). Northern emporia and maritime networks. Modelling past communication using archaeological network analysis. I J. Preiser-Kapeller, & F. Daim (red.), Harbours and Maritime Networks as Complex Aadptive Systems (Bind 23, s. 105-118). Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums. RGZM - Tagungen Bind 23

CBE

Sindbæk SM. 2015. Northern emporia and maritime networks. Modelling past communication using archaeological network analysis. Preiser-Kapeller J, Daim F, red. I Harbours and Maritime Networks as Complex Aadptive Systems. Mainz: Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums. s. 105-118. (RGZM - Tagungen, Bind 23).

MLA

Sindbæk, Søren Michael "Northern emporia and maritime networks. Modelling past communication using archaeological network analysis". og Preiser-Kapeller, J. Daim, F. (red.). Harbours and Maritime Networks as Complex Aadptive Systems. Mainz: Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums. (RGZM - Tagungen, Bind 23). 2015, 105-118.

Vancouver

Sindbæk SM. Northern emporia and maritime networks. Modelling past communication using archaeological network analysis. I Preiser-Kapeller J, Daim F, red., Harbours and Maritime Networks as Complex Aadptive Systems. Bind 23. Mainz: Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums. 2015. s. 105-118. (RGZM - Tagungen, Bind 23).

Author

Sindbæk, Søren Michael. / Northern emporia and maritime networks. Modelling past communication using archaeological network analysis. Harbours and Maritime Networks as Complex Aadptive Systems. red. / J. Preiser-Kapeller ; F. Daim. Bind 23 Mainz : Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums, 2015. s. 105-118 (RGZM - Tagungen, Bind 23).

Bibtex

@inproceedings{9e06c6a416b140719ecb5b117c84f71f,
title = "Northern emporia and maritime networks. Modelling past communication using archaeological network analysis",
abstract = "Long-distance communication has emerged as a particular focus for archaeologicalexploration using network theory, analysis, and modelling. The promise is apparentlyobvious: communication in the past doubtlessly had properties of complex, dynamicnetworks, and archaeological datasets almost certainly preserve patterns of thisinteraction. Formal network analysis and modelling holds the potential to identify anddemonstrate such patterns, where traditional methods often prove inadequate. Thearchaeological study of communication networks in the past, however, calls for radically different analytical methods from those employed by most other forms of social network analysis. The fragmentary archaeological evidence presentsresearchers with the task of reconstructing the broken links of a ruined network fromobservable distributions and patterns of association in the archaeological record. Informal terms this is not a problem of network analysis, but network synthesis: theclassic problem of cracking codes or reconstructing black-box circuits. It is proposedthat archaeological approaches to network synthesis must involve a contextualreading of network data: observations arising from individual contexts, morphologies,and use patterns. This point is demonstrated with reference to a study of Viking-period communication in the North Sea region",
author = "Sindb{\ae}k, {S{\o}ren Michael}",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-3-88467-248-8",
volume = "23",
series = "RGZM - Tagungen",
publisher = "Verlag des R{\"o}misch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums",
pages = "105--118",
editor = "J. Preiser-Kapeller and F. Daim",
booktitle = "Harbours and Maritime Networks as Complex Aadptive Systems",
note = "null ; Conference date: 17-10-2013 Through 18-10-2013",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Northern emporia and maritime networks. Modelling past communication using archaeological network analysis

AU - Sindbæk, Søren Michael

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Long-distance communication has emerged as a particular focus for archaeologicalexploration using network theory, analysis, and modelling. The promise is apparentlyobvious: communication in the past doubtlessly had properties of complex, dynamicnetworks, and archaeological datasets almost certainly preserve patterns of thisinteraction. Formal network analysis and modelling holds the potential to identify anddemonstrate such patterns, where traditional methods often prove inadequate. Thearchaeological study of communication networks in the past, however, calls for radically different analytical methods from those employed by most other forms of social network analysis. The fragmentary archaeological evidence presentsresearchers with the task of reconstructing the broken links of a ruined network fromobservable distributions and patterns of association in the archaeological record. Informal terms this is not a problem of network analysis, but network synthesis: theclassic problem of cracking codes or reconstructing black-box circuits. It is proposedthat archaeological approaches to network synthesis must involve a contextualreading of network data: observations arising from individual contexts, morphologies,and use patterns. This point is demonstrated with reference to a study of Viking-period communication in the North Sea region

AB - Long-distance communication has emerged as a particular focus for archaeologicalexploration using network theory, analysis, and modelling. The promise is apparentlyobvious: communication in the past doubtlessly had properties of complex, dynamicnetworks, and archaeological datasets almost certainly preserve patterns of thisinteraction. Formal network analysis and modelling holds the potential to identify anddemonstrate such patterns, where traditional methods often prove inadequate. Thearchaeological study of communication networks in the past, however, calls for radically different analytical methods from those employed by most other forms of social network analysis. The fragmentary archaeological evidence presentsresearchers with the task of reconstructing the broken links of a ruined network fromobservable distributions and patterns of association in the archaeological record. Informal terms this is not a problem of network analysis, but network synthesis: theclassic problem of cracking codes or reconstructing black-box circuits. It is proposedthat archaeological approaches to network synthesis must involve a contextualreading of network data: observations arising from individual contexts, morphologies,and use patterns. This point is demonstrated with reference to a study of Viking-period communication in the North Sea region

M3 - Article in proceedings

SN - 978-3-88467-248-8

VL - 23

T3 - RGZM - Tagungen

SP - 105

EP - 118

BT - Harbours and Maritime Networks as Complex Aadptive Systems

A2 - Preiser-Kapeller, J.

A2 - Daim, F.

PB - Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums

CY - Mainz

Y2 - 17 October 2013 through 18 October 2013

ER -