Nitrogen rhizodeposition by legumes and its fate in agroecosystems: A field study and literature review

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  • Xiquan Wang, China Agr Univ, China Agricultural University, Coll Agron & Biotechnol, Minist Agr, Key Lab Farming Syst
  • ,
  • Yadong Yang, China Agr Univ, China Agricultural University, Coll Agron & Biotechnol, Minist Agr, Key Lab Farming Syst
  • ,
  • Kuan Pei, China Agr Univ, China Agricultural University, Coll Agron & Biotechnol, Minist Agr, Key Lab Farming Syst
  • ,
  • Jie Zhou, Georg August Univ Gottingen, University of Gottingen, Dept Crop Sci, Biogeochem Agroecosyst
  • ,
  • Leanne Peixoto
  • Anna Gunina, Dokuchaev Soil Sci Inst, Dokuchaev Soil Science Institute, Dept Soil Biol & Biochem
  • ,
  • Zhaohai Zeng, China Agr Univ, China Agricultural University, Coll Agron & Biotechnol, Minist Agr, Key Lab Farming Syst
  • ,
  • Huadong Zang, China Agr Univ, China Agricultural University, Coll Agron & Biotechnol, Minist Agr, Key Lab Farming Syst
  • ,
  • Jim Rasmussen
  • Yakov Kuzyakov, RUDN Univ, Peoples Friendship University of Russia, Agrotechnol Inst

Quantification of legume nitrogen (N) rhizodeposition (N derived from roots) and its fate in agroecosystems is crucial for managing soil fertility, land productivity, and agriculture sustainability. In contrast to forage legumes, the N rhizodeposition by grain legumes is nearly unknown. Therefore, N rhizodeposition of four grain legumes and its transfer to subsequent wheat crops was quantified using the(15)N stem labeling method under field conditions. The N rhizodeposition of the grain legumes: peanut, soybean, mungbean, and adzuki bean amounted to 25, 51, 20, and 63 kg N ha(-1), respectively. N rhizodeposition was not affected by fertilization, and it was 53-257% more accumulated in topsoil (0-20 cm) than that in subsoil (20-40 cm). However, N rhizodeposition per unit of root biomass in subsoil was 3.5-times as much as that in topsoil (p <0.05), indicating the importance of legumes for soil fertility and exploration in subsoil. Remarkably, subsequent wheat utilized 13-85% of legume N rhizodeposition, which contributed to 4-20% of total wheat N uptake. Combining the present data with the literature review, the average N rhizodeposition of legumes (both grain and forage legumes) is 83 kg N ha(-1)(n= 75), and one-fourth of which was utilized by subsequent cereals. Increasing root biomass by 1 g increases rhizodeposition by 53 mg N. In conclusion, legume N rhizodeposition is crucial for the sustainability of legume-based crop rotations resulting in soil N build-up and is an important N source for subsequent crops.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftLand Degradation & Development
Vol/bind32
Nummer1
Sider (fra-til)410-419
Antal sider10
ISSN1085-3278
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2021

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