Nitrogen removal in woodchip-based biofilters of variable designs treating agricultural drainage discharges

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Nitrogen removal in woodchip-based biofilters of variable designs treating agricultural drainage discharges. / Hoffmann, Carl Christian; Larsen, Søren Erik; Kjaergaard, Charlotte.

I: Journal of Environmental Quality, Bind 48, Nr. 6, 2019, s. 1881-1889.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Hoffmann, Carl Christian ; Larsen, Søren Erik ; Kjaergaard, Charlotte. / Nitrogen removal in woodchip-based biofilters of variable designs treating agricultural drainage discharges. I: Journal of Environmental Quality. 2019 ; Bind 48, Nr. 6. s. 1881-1889.

Bibtex

@article{c9dc4896cb054b11836808a26a13cf3d,
title = "Nitrogen removal in woodchip-based biofilters of variable designs treating agricultural drainage discharges",
abstract = "Subsurface flow wetlands with a woodchip-based biofilter are known to act as effective measures in mitigating site-specific nutrient losses in agricultural drainage. To optimize operation, the combined effect of water temperature, hydraulic residence time (HRT), and filter design is fundamental. This 2-yr study evaluated a combination of three flow designs and two woodchips mixtures at a test facility receiving agricultural drainage discharge from a 78-ha catchment. The biofilter test facility consisted of six independent parallel-constructed wetlands (CW1-CW6), with two types of filter mixtures and three different hydraulic designs (horizontal, vertical upward, and vertical downward flow). Horizontal CWs performed best with an annual removal of total N (TN) amounting to 53 to 54{\%} of the load, corresponding to a daily removal of 2.16 to 2.32 g N m-3 d-1. Removal by the vertical CWs amounted to 38 to 60{\%} of the TN load or 1.19 to 2.31 g N m-3 d-1. Despite low temperatures and HRT down to 3 h, all CWs functioned well in winter with 20 to 30{\%} N removal. In contrast, during summer when the hydraulic load was low and HRT was up to >96 h, N removal was ∼100{\%}, and the reduction sequence proceeded with sulfate reduction and formation of H2S. Statistical analysis and model development revealed that the percentage removal of both TN and nitrate N was mostly dependent on water temperature and HRT, explaining 81.7 to 91.1 and 83.5 to 89.5{\%} of the variation, respectively.",
author = "Hoffmann, {Carl Christian} and Larsen, {S{\o}ren Erik} and Charlotte Kjaergaard",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.2134/jeq2018.12.0442",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "1881--1889",
journal = "Journal of Environmental Quality",
issn = "0047-2425",
publisher = "American Society of Agronomy",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nitrogen removal in woodchip-based biofilters of variable designs treating agricultural drainage discharges

AU - Hoffmann, Carl Christian

AU - Larsen, Søren Erik

AU - Kjaergaard, Charlotte

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Subsurface flow wetlands with a woodchip-based biofilter are known to act as effective measures in mitigating site-specific nutrient losses in agricultural drainage. To optimize operation, the combined effect of water temperature, hydraulic residence time (HRT), and filter design is fundamental. This 2-yr study evaluated a combination of three flow designs and two woodchips mixtures at a test facility receiving agricultural drainage discharge from a 78-ha catchment. The biofilter test facility consisted of six independent parallel-constructed wetlands (CW1-CW6), with two types of filter mixtures and three different hydraulic designs (horizontal, vertical upward, and vertical downward flow). Horizontal CWs performed best with an annual removal of total N (TN) amounting to 53 to 54% of the load, corresponding to a daily removal of 2.16 to 2.32 g N m-3 d-1. Removal by the vertical CWs amounted to 38 to 60% of the TN load or 1.19 to 2.31 g N m-3 d-1. Despite low temperatures and HRT down to 3 h, all CWs functioned well in winter with 20 to 30% N removal. In contrast, during summer when the hydraulic load was low and HRT was up to >96 h, N removal was ∼100%, and the reduction sequence proceeded with sulfate reduction and formation of H2S. Statistical analysis and model development revealed that the percentage removal of both TN and nitrate N was mostly dependent on water temperature and HRT, explaining 81.7 to 91.1 and 83.5 to 89.5% of the variation, respectively.

AB - Subsurface flow wetlands with a woodchip-based biofilter are known to act as effective measures in mitigating site-specific nutrient losses in agricultural drainage. To optimize operation, the combined effect of water temperature, hydraulic residence time (HRT), and filter design is fundamental. This 2-yr study evaluated a combination of three flow designs and two woodchips mixtures at a test facility receiving agricultural drainage discharge from a 78-ha catchment. The biofilter test facility consisted of six independent parallel-constructed wetlands (CW1-CW6), with two types of filter mixtures and three different hydraulic designs (horizontal, vertical upward, and vertical downward flow). Horizontal CWs performed best with an annual removal of total N (TN) amounting to 53 to 54% of the load, corresponding to a daily removal of 2.16 to 2.32 g N m-3 d-1. Removal by the vertical CWs amounted to 38 to 60% of the TN load or 1.19 to 2.31 g N m-3 d-1. Despite low temperatures and HRT down to 3 h, all CWs functioned well in winter with 20 to 30% N removal. In contrast, during summer when the hydraulic load was low and HRT was up to >96 h, N removal was ∼100%, and the reduction sequence proceeded with sulfate reduction and formation of H2S. Statistical analysis and model development revealed that the percentage removal of both TN and nitrate N was mostly dependent on water temperature and HRT, explaining 81.7 to 91.1 and 83.5 to 89.5% of the variation, respectively.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074480045&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2134/jeq2018.12.0442

DO - 10.2134/jeq2018.12.0442

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85074480045

VL - 48

SP - 1881

EP - 1889

JO - Journal of Environmental Quality

JF - Journal of Environmental Quality

SN - 0047-2425

IS - 6

ER -