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Networking Fatigue, Self-Care and JOMO* in International Research Exchange (*the joy of missing out)

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Networking Fatigue, Self-Care and JOMO* in International Research Exchange (*the joy of missing out). / Høg Utoft, Ea.

I: M@n@gement, Bind 23, Nr. 1, 03.2020, s. 120-124.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{38f57bb5f5e54f2fba5f743325e53374,
title = "Networking Fatigue, Self-Care and JOMO* in International Research Exchange (*the joy of missing out)",
abstract = "This autoethnography explores my story of overcoming fatigue on international research exchange. International exchange offers ample opportunity to network, and networking is considered indispensable to a career in academia. Therefore, in my experience, the context of exchange is characterised by a constant state of FOMO, i.e. the fear of missing out. But on exchange, building social relationships and making friends is also part of the networking that travelling scholars have to do in order to thrive. When FOMO is ever lurking, and all or most connections that travelling early-career researchers have are new and superficial, the risk of – what I term – {\textquoteleft}networking fatigue{\textquoteright} is also high. I experienced networking fatigue mentally and physically, which required that I withdrew and decompressed. Therefore, in this piece, I offer a few lessons learnt about self-care on international research exchange. My hope is that it may benefit early-career researchers going abroad in the future. For me, self-care meant prioritising the creation of deeper relationships over networking and maintaining some degree of familiarity in the way I was living and my accommodation. Finally, I champion JOMO, i.e. the joy of missing out, on exchange (at least occasionally) in order to sustain myself and my well-being and to persevere in the hyper-competitive, neoliberal, academic labour market of which international mobility requirements and the networking imperative are part.",
author = "{H{\o}g Utoft}, Ea",
year = "2020",
month = mar,
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "120--124",
journal = "M@n@gement",
issn = "1286-4692",
publisher = "Association Internationale de Management Strategique (AIMS)",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Networking Fatigue, Self-Care and JOMO* in International Research Exchange (*the joy of missing out)

AU - Høg Utoft, Ea

PY - 2020/3

Y1 - 2020/3

N2 - This autoethnography explores my story of overcoming fatigue on international research exchange. International exchange offers ample opportunity to network, and networking is considered indispensable to a career in academia. Therefore, in my experience, the context of exchange is characterised by a constant state of FOMO, i.e. the fear of missing out. But on exchange, building social relationships and making friends is also part of the networking that travelling scholars have to do in order to thrive. When FOMO is ever lurking, and all or most connections that travelling early-career researchers have are new and superficial, the risk of – what I term – ‘networking fatigue’ is also high. I experienced networking fatigue mentally and physically, which required that I withdrew and decompressed. Therefore, in this piece, I offer a few lessons learnt about self-care on international research exchange. My hope is that it may benefit early-career researchers going abroad in the future. For me, self-care meant prioritising the creation of deeper relationships over networking and maintaining some degree of familiarity in the way I was living and my accommodation. Finally, I champion JOMO, i.e. the joy of missing out, on exchange (at least occasionally) in order to sustain myself and my well-being and to persevere in the hyper-competitive, neoliberal, academic labour market of which international mobility requirements and the networking imperative are part.

AB - This autoethnography explores my story of overcoming fatigue on international research exchange. International exchange offers ample opportunity to network, and networking is considered indispensable to a career in academia. Therefore, in my experience, the context of exchange is characterised by a constant state of FOMO, i.e. the fear of missing out. But on exchange, building social relationships and making friends is also part of the networking that travelling scholars have to do in order to thrive. When FOMO is ever lurking, and all or most connections that travelling early-career researchers have are new and superficial, the risk of – what I term – ‘networking fatigue’ is also high. I experienced networking fatigue mentally and physically, which required that I withdrew and decompressed. Therefore, in this piece, I offer a few lessons learnt about self-care on international research exchange. My hope is that it may benefit early-career researchers going abroad in the future. For me, self-care meant prioritising the creation of deeper relationships over networking and maintaining some degree of familiarity in the way I was living and my accommodation. Finally, I champion JOMO, i.e. the joy of missing out, on exchange (at least occasionally) in order to sustain myself and my well-being and to persevere in the hyper-competitive, neoliberal, academic labour market of which international mobility requirements and the networking imperative are part.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 23

SP - 120

EP - 124

JO - M@n@gement

JF - M@n@gement

SN - 1286-4692

IS - 1

ER -