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Natural and Anthropogenically Influenced Isoprene Oxidation in Southeastern United States and Central Amazon

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Natural and Anthropogenically Influenced Isoprene Oxidation in Southeastern United States and Central Amazon. / Yee, Lindsay D.; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Wernis, Rebecca A.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Glasius, Marianne; Riva, Matthieu; Surratt, Jason D.; de Sá, Suzane S.; Martin, Scot T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Liu, Yingjun; Misztal, Pawel K.; Artaxo, Paulo; Viegas, Juarez; Manzi, Antonio; de Souza, Rodrigo A.F.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Baumann, Karsten; Goldstein, Allen H.

I: Environmental Science & Technology, Bind 54, Nr. 10, 05.2020, s. 5980-5991.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Yee, LD, Isaacman-VanWertz, G, Wernis, RA, Kreisberg, NM, Glasius, M, Riva, M, Surratt, JD, de Sá, SS, Martin, ST, Alexander, ML, Palm, BB, Hu, W, Campuzano-Jost, P, Day, DA, Jimenez, JL, Liu, Y, Misztal, PK, Artaxo, P, Viegas, J, Manzi, A, de Souza, RAF, Edgerton, ES, Baumann, K & Goldstein, AH 2020, 'Natural and Anthropogenically Influenced Isoprene Oxidation in Southeastern United States and Central Amazon', Environmental Science & Technology, bind 54, nr. 10, s. 5980-5991. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.0c00805

APA

Yee, L. D., Isaacman-VanWertz, G., Wernis, R. A., Kreisberg, N. M., Glasius, M., Riva, M., Surratt, J. D., de Sá, S. S., Martin, S. T., Alexander, M. L., Palm, B. B., Hu, W., Campuzano-Jost, P., Day, D. A., Jimenez, J. L., Liu, Y., Misztal, P. K., Artaxo, P., Viegas, J., ... Goldstein, A. H. (2020). Natural and Anthropogenically Influenced Isoprene Oxidation in Southeastern United States and Central Amazon. Environmental Science & Technology, 54(10), 5980-5991. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.0c00805

CBE

Yee LD, Isaacman-VanWertz G, Wernis RA, Kreisberg NM, Glasius M, Riva M, Surratt JD, de Sá SS, Martin ST, Alexander ML, Palm BB, Hu W, Campuzano-Jost P, Day DA, Jimenez JL, Liu Y, Misztal PK, Artaxo P, Viegas J, Manzi A, de Souza RAF, Edgerton ES, Baumann K, Goldstein AH. 2020. Natural and Anthropogenically Influenced Isoprene Oxidation in Southeastern United States and Central Amazon. Environmental Science & Technology. 54(10):5980-5991. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.0c00805

MLA

Vancouver

Yee LD, Isaacman-VanWertz G, Wernis RA, Kreisberg NM, Glasius M, Riva M o.a. Natural and Anthropogenically Influenced Isoprene Oxidation in Southeastern United States and Central Amazon. Environmental Science & Technology. 2020 maj;54(10):5980-5991. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.0c00805

Author

Yee, Lindsay D. ; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel ; Wernis, Rebecca A. ; Kreisberg, Nathan M. ; Glasius, Marianne ; Riva, Matthieu ; Surratt, Jason D. ; de Sá, Suzane S. ; Martin, Scot T. ; Alexander, M. Lizabeth ; Palm, Brett B. ; Hu, Weiwei ; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro ; Day, Douglas A. ; Jimenez, Jose L. ; Liu, Yingjun ; Misztal, Pawel K. ; Artaxo, Paulo ; Viegas, Juarez ; Manzi, Antonio ; de Souza, Rodrigo A.F. ; Edgerton, Eric S. ; Baumann, Karsten ; Goldstein, Allen H. / Natural and Anthropogenically Influenced Isoprene Oxidation in Southeastern United States and Central Amazon. I: Environmental Science & Technology. 2020 ; Bind 54, Nr. 10. s. 5980-5991.

Bibtex

@article{977b73fd884e489eab8fbad74d0f8764,
title = "Natural and Anthropogenically Influenced Isoprene Oxidation in Southeastern United States and Central Amazon",
abstract = "Anthropogenic emissions alter secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemistry from naturally emitted isoprene. We use correlations of tracers and tracer ratios to provide new perspectives on sulfate, NOx, and particle acidity influencing isoprene-derived SOA in two isoprene-rich forested environments representing clean to polluted conditions-wet and dry seasons in central Amazonia and Southeastern U.S. summer. We used a semivolatile thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (SV-TAG) and filter samplers to measure SOA tracers indicative of isoprene/HO2 (2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, 2-methyltetrol organosulfates) and isoprene/NOx (2-methylglyceric acid, 2-methylglyceric acid organosulfate) pathways. Summed concentrations of these tracers correlated with particulate sulfate spanning three orders of magnitude, suggesting that 1 μg m-3 reduction in sulfate corresponds with at least ∼0.5 μg m-3 reduction in isoprene-derived SOA. We also find that isoprene/NOx pathway SOA mass primarily comprises organosulfates, ∼97% in the Amazon and ∼55% in Southeastern United States. We infer under natural conditions in high isoprene emission regions that preindustrial aerosol sulfate was almost exclusively isoprene-derived organosulfates, which are traditionally thought of as representative of an anthropogenic influence. We further report the first field observations showing that particle acidity correlates positively with 2-methylglyceric acid partitioning to the gas phase and negatively with the ratio of 2-methyltetrols to C5-alkene triols.",
author = "Yee, {Lindsay D.} and Gabriel Isaacman-VanWertz and Wernis, {Rebecca A.} and Kreisberg, {Nathan M.} and Marianne Glasius and Matthieu Riva and Surratt, {Jason D.} and {de S{\'a}}, {Suzane S.} and Martin, {Scot T.} and Alexander, {M. Lizabeth} and Palm, {Brett B.} and Weiwei Hu and Pedro Campuzano-Jost and Day, {Douglas A.} and Jimenez, {Jose L.} and Yingjun Liu and Misztal, {Pawel K.} and Paulo Artaxo and Juarez Viegas and Antonio Manzi and {de Souza}, {Rodrigo A.F.} and Edgerton, {Eric S.} and Karsten Baumann and Goldstein, {Allen H.}",
year = "2020",
month = may,
doi = "10.1021/acs.est.0c00805",
language = "English",
volume = "54",
pages = "5980--5991",
journal = "Environmental Science & Technology (Washington)",
issn = "0013-936X",
publisher = "AMER CHEMICAL SOC",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Natural and Anthropogenically Influenced Isoprene Oxidation in Southeastern United States and Central Amazon

AU - Yee, Lindsay D.

AU - Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel

AU - Wernis, Rebecca A.

AU - Kreisberg, Nathan M.

AU - Glasius, Marianne

AU - Riva, Matthieu

AU - Surratt, Jason D.

AU - de Sá, Suzane S.

AU - Martin, Scot T.

AU - Alexander, M. Lizabeth

AU - Palm, Brett B.

AU - Hu, Weiwei

AU - Campuzano-Jost, Pedro

AU - Day, Douglas A.

AU - Jimenez, Jose L.

AU - Liu, Yingjun

AU - Misztal, Pawel K.

AU - Artaxo, Paulo

AU - Viegas, Juarez

AU - Manzi, Antonio

AU - de Souza, Rodrigo A.F.

AU - Edgerton, Eric S.

AU - Baumann, Karsten

AU - Goldstein, Allen H.

PY - 2020/5

Y1 - 2020/5

N2 - Anthropogenic emissions alter secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemistry from naturally emitted isoprene. We use correlations of tracers and tracer ratios to provide new perspectives on sulfate, NOx, and particle acidity influencing isoprene-derived SOA in two isoprene-rich forested environments representing clean to polluted conditions-wet and dry seasons in central Amazonia and Southeastern U.S. summer. We used a semivolatile thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (SV-TAG) and filter samplers to measure SOA tracers indicative of isoprene/HO2 (2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, 2-methyltetrol organosulfates) and isoprene/NOx (2-methylglyceric acid, 2-methylglyceric acid organosulfate) pathways. Summed concentrations of these tracers correlated with particulate sulfate spanning three orders of magnitude, suggesting that 1 μg m-3 reduction in sulfate corresponds with at least ∼0.5 μg m-3 reduction in isoprene-derived SOA. We also find that isoprene/NOx pathway SOA mass primarily comprises organosulfates, ∼97% in the Amazon and ∼55% in Southeastern United States. We infer under natural conditions in high isoprene emission regions that preindustrial aerosol sulfate was almost exclusively isoprene-derived organosulfates, which are traditionally thought of as representative of an anthropogenic influence. We further report the first field observations showing that particle acidity correlates positively with 2-methylglyceric acid partitioning to the gas phase and negatively with the ratio of 2-methyltetrols to C5-alkene triols.

AB - Anthropogenic emissions alter secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemistry from naturally emitted isoprene. We use correlations of tracers and tracer ratios to provide new perspectives on sulfate, NOx, and particle acidity influencing isoprene-derived SOA in two isoprene-rich forested environments representing clean to polluted conditions-wet and dry seasons in central Amazonia and Southeastern U.S. summer. We used a semivolatile thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (SV-TAG) and filter samplers to measure SOA tracers indicative of isoprene/HO2 (2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, 2-methyltetrol organosulfates) and isoprene/NOx (2-methylglyceric acid, 2-methylglyceric acid organosulfate) pathways. Summed concentrations of these tracers correlated with particulate sulfate spanning three orders of magnitude, suggesting that 1 μg m-3 reduction in sulfate corresponds with at least ∼0.5 μg m-3 reduction in isoprene-derived SOA. We also find that isoprene/NOx pathway SOA mass primarily comprises organosulfates, ∼97% in the Amazon and ∼55% in Southeastern United States. We infer under natural conditions in high isoprene emission regions that preindustrial aerosol sulfate was almost exclusively isoprene-derived organosulfates, which are traditionally thought of as representative of an anthropogenic influence. We further report the first field observations showing that particle acidity correlates positively with 2-methylglyceric acid partitioning to the gas phase and negatively with the ratio of 2-methyltetrols to C5-alkene triols.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85084939625&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/acs.est.0c00805

DO - 10.1021/acs.est.0c00805

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32271021

AN - SCOPUS:85084939625

VL - 54

SP - 5980

EP - 5991

JO - Environmental Science & Technology (Washington)

JF - Environmental Science & Technology (Washington)

SN - 0013-936X

IS - 10

ER -