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More Years Better Lives: – A Strategic Research Agenda on Demographic Change is a publication of the Joint Programming Initiative More Years, Better Lives – The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change Brussels, 2014

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@book{6b7db1bc346e4a81b573dbdf9d201398,
title = "More Years Better Lives: – A Strategic Research Agenda on Demographic Change is a publication of the Joint Programming Initiative More Years, Better Lives – The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change Brussels, 2014",
abstract = "Demographic change is changing theshape of Europe. Rising life expectancy,combined with low fertility rates andcomplex patterns of migration, meanthat while the size of the populationremains stable, its distribution andaverage age is rising steadily. At thesame time general health is improving,so that today{\textquoteright}s 65-year-olds are likelyto be healthier and more active thantheir parents were at the same age,and the proportion of people aged over80 is rising rapidly. As a result, for thefirst time in history, a substantial – andgrowing – proportion of the populationis healthy and active but not in theworkforce.Demographic change is caused bythree factors: rising life expectancy,an upward trend which has beenconsistent for over a century; lowfertility rates, which vary betweencountries, but are overall belowreplacement rate; and migration, withinEurope itself and between Europe andthe rest of the world, which may helpoffset the effects of ageing in somecounties or regions, but which brings itsown challenges.Alongside this change in thestructure of the population, we areseeing a reshaping of the lifecourse,from a fairly simple one with threestages – childhood, working life andretirement – to one with four stages– childhood, mid-life, the new phase ofactive later life4 and old age. At the sametime, patterns of family structure, andintergenerational relationships, rightsand responsibilities are all changing .This is not happening in a vacuum.Changes in the nature of work – bothpaid and unpaid – are taking place,as are the expectations we have ofgovernment. The financial crisis whichbegan in 2008 has led governments toquestion the viability of welfare modelswhich had been relatively stable fora generation or more. Developments inbiotechnology and assistive technologiesare enabling people to live longerand healthier lives, but sometimes ata substantial cost. Communication technologiesare transforming how peopleinteract, how business is done and howpublic services are delivered. Thesechanges have positive and negativedimensions and can present specialchallenges to some older people.",
author = "{Members of Advisory Boards and the thematic Working Groups} and Tine Fristrup",
editor = "Stephen McNair",
year = "2014",
month = oct,
day = "1",
language = "English",

}

RIS

TY - RPRT

T1 - More Years Better Lives

T2 - – A Strategic Research Agenda on Demographic Change is a publication of the Joint Programming Initiative More Years, Better Lives – The Potential and Challenges of Demographic Change Brussels, 2014

AU - Members of Advisory Boards and the thematic Working Groups

AU - Fristrup, Tine

A2 - McNair, Stephen

PY - 2014/10/1

Y1 - 2014/10/1

N2 - Demographic change is changing theshape of Europe. Rising life expectancy,combined with low fertility rates andcomplex patterns of migration, meanthat while the size of the populationremains stable, its distribution andaverage age is rising steadily. At thesame time general health is improving,so that today’s 65-year-olds are likelyto be healthier and more active thantheir parents were at the same age,and the proportion of people aged over80 is rising rapidly. As a result, for thefirst time in history, a substantial – andgrowing – proportion of the populationis healthy and active but not in theworkforce.Demographic change is caused bythree factors: rising life expectancy,an upward trend which has beenconsistent for over a century; lowfertility rates, which vary betweencountries, but are overall belowreplacement rate; and migration, withinEurope itself and between Europe andthe rest of the world, which may helpoffset the effects of ageing in somecounties or regions, but which brings itsown challenges.Alongside this change in thestructure of the population, we areseeing a reshaping of the lifecourse,from a fairly simple one with threestages – childhood, working life andretirement – to one with four stages– childhood, mid-life, the new phase ofactive later life4 and old age. At the sametime, patterns of family structure, andintergenerational relationships, rightsand responsibilities are all changing .This is not happening in a vacuum.Changes in the nature of work – bothpaid and unpaid – are taking place,as are the expectations we have ofgovernment. The financial crisis whichbegan in 2008 has led governments toquestion the viability of welfare modelswhich had been relatively stable fora generation or more. Developments inbiotechnology and assistive technologiesare enabling people to live longerand healthier lives, but sometimes ata substantial cost. Communication technologiesare transforming how peopleinteract, how business is done and howpublic services are delivered. Thesechanges have positive and negativedimensions and can present specialchallenges to some older people.

AB - Demographic change is changing theshape of Europe. Rising life expectancy,combined with low fertility rates andcomplex patterns of migration, meanthat while the size of the populationremains stable, its distribution andaverage age is rising steadily. At thesame time general health is improving,so that today’s 65-year-olds are likelyto be healthier and more active thantheir parents were at the same age,and the proportion of people aged over80 is rising rapidly. As a result, for thefirst time in history, a substantial – andgrowing – proportion of the populationis healthy and active but not in theworkforce.Demographic change is caused bythree factors: rising life expectancy,an upward trend which has beenconsistent for over a century; lowfertility rates, which vary betweencountries, but are overall belowreplacement rate; and migration, withinEurope itself and between Europe andthe rest of the world, which may helpoffset the effects of ageing in somecounties or regions, but which brings itsown challenges.Alongside this change in thestructure of the population, we areseeing a reshaping of the lifecourse,from a fairly simple one with threestages – childhood, working life andretirement – to one with four stages– childhood, mid-life, the new phase ofactive later life4 and old age. At the sametime, patterns of family structure, andintergenerational relationships, rightsand responsibilities are all changing .This is not happening in a vacuum.Changes in the nature of work – bothpaid and unpaid – are taking place,as are the expectations we have ofgovernment. The financial crisis whichbegan in 2008 has led governments toquestion the viability of welfare modelswhich had been relatively stable fora generation or more. Developments inbiotechnology and assistive technologiesare enabling people to live longerand healthier lives, but sometimes ata substantial cost. Communication technologiesare transforming how peopleinteract, how business is done and howpublic services are delivered. Thesechanges have positive and negativedimensions and can present specialchallenges to some older people.

M3 - Report

BT - More Years Better Lives

ER -