Mindfulness for group facilitation: An example of Eastern philosophy in Western organizations

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Mindfulness for group facilitation : An example of Eastern philosophy in Western organizations. / Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Krohn, Simon.

I: Group Facilitation, Bind 2014, Nr. 13, 2014, s. 15-35.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{0c24134ed54945189df4e3af2605c554,
title = "Mindfulness for group facilitation: An example of Eastern philosophy in Western organizations",
abstract = "In this paper, we argue that mindfulness techniques can be used for enhancing the outcome of group performance. The word mindfulness has different connotations in the academic literature. Broadly speaking there is ‘mindfulness without meditation’ or ‘Western’ mindfulness which involves active thinking and ‘Eastern’ mindfulness which refers to an open, accepting state of mind, as intended with Buddhist-inspired techniques such as meditation. In this paper, we are interested in the latter type of mindfulness and demonstrate how Eastern mindfulness techniques can be used as a tool for facilitation. A brief introduction to the physiology and philosophy of Eastern mindfulness constitutes the basis for the arguments of the effect of mindfulness techniques. The use of mindfulness techniques for group facilitation is novel as it changes the focus from individuals’ mindfulness practice to that of the collective group, and has a subsequent effect on participant’s attention, levels of energy, and experience of the group atmosphere. We discuss some of the problems encountered when mindfulness techniques are used in organizations and provide recommendations for facilitators wanting to employ mindfulness techniques.",
keywords = "Mindfulness, Facilitering, Internationalisering/globalisering, L{\ae}ring og l{\ae}ringsmilj{\o}er, Voksenl{\ae}ring, Facilitering af videnprocesser, Internationalisering/globalisering, L{\ae}ring og l{\ae}ringsmilj{\o}er, Voksenl{\ae}ring, Facilitering af videnprocesser",
author = "Adriansen, {Hanne Kirstine} and Simon Krohn",
year = "2014",
language = "English",
volume = "2014",
pages = "15--35",
journal = "Group Facilitation",
issn = "1534-5653",
number = "13",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mindfulness for group facilitation

T2 - An example of Eastern philosophy in Western organizations

AU - Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

AU - Krohn, Simon

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - In this paper, we argue that mindfulness techniques can be used for enhancing the outcome of group performance. The word mindfulness has different connotations in the academic literature. Broadly speaking there is ‘mindfulness without meditation’ or ‘Western’ mindfulness which involves active thinking and ‘Eastern’ mindfulness which refers to an open, accepting state of mind, as intended with Buddhist-inspired techniques such as meditation. In this paper, we are interested in the latter type of mindfulness and demonstrate how Eastern mindfulness techniques can be used as a tool for facilitation. A brief introduction to the physiology and philosophy of Eastern mindfulness constitutes the basis for the arguments of the effect of mindfulness techniques. The use of mindfulness techniques for group facilitation is novel as it changes the focus from individuals’ mindfulness practice to that of the collective group, and has a subsequent effect on participant’s attention, levels of energy, and experience of the group atmosphere. We discuss some of the problems encountered when mindfulness techniques are used in organizations and provide recommendations for facilitators wanting to employ mindfulness techniques.

AB - In this paper, we argue that mindfulness techniques can be used for enhancing the outcome of group performance. The word mindfulness has different connotations in the academic literature. Broadly speaking there is ‘mindfulness without meditation’ or ‘Western’ mindfulness which involves active thinking and ‘Eastern’ mindfulness which refers to an open, accepting state of mind, as intended with Buddhist-inspired techniques such as meditation. In this paper, we are interested in the latter type of mindfulness and demonstrate how Eastern mindfulness techniques can be used as a tool for facilitation. A brief introduction to the physiology and philosophy of Eastern mindfulness constitutes the basis for the arguments of the effect of mindfulness techniques. The use of mindfulness techniques for group facilitation is novel as it changes the focus from individuals’ mindfulness practice to that of the collective group, and has a subsequent effect on participant’s attention, levels of energy, and experience of the group atmosphere. We discuss some of the problems encountered when mindfulness techniques are used in organizations and provide recommendations for facilitators wanting to employ mindfulness techniques.

KW - Mindfulness

KW - Facilitering

KW - Internationalisering/globalisering

KW - Læring og læringsmiljøer

KW - Voksenlæring

KW - Facilitering af videnprocesser

KW - Internationalisering/globalisering

KW - Læring og læringsmiljøer

KW - Voksenlæring

KW - Facilitering af videnprocesser

M3 - Journal article

VL - 2014

SP - 15

EP - 35

JO - Group Facilitation

JF - Group Facilitation

SN - 1534-5653

IS - 13

ER -