Mesoamerican origin of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is revealed by sequence data

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  • Elena Bitocchi, Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari ed Ambientali, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Italien
  • Laura Nanni, Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari ed Ambientali, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Italien
  • Elisa Bellucci, Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari ed Ambientali, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Italien
  • Monica Rossi, Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari ed Ambientali, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Italien
  • Alessandro Giardini, Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari ed Ambientali, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Italien
  • Pierluigi Spagnoletti Zeuli, Dipartimento di Biologia Difesa e Biotecnologie Agro-Forestali, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Italien
  • Giuseppina Logozzo, bDipartimento di Biologia Difesa e Biotecnologie Agro-Forestali, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Italien
  • Jens Stougaard
  • Phillip McClean, dDepartment of Plant Sciences, North Dakota State University, USA
  • Giovanna Attene, Dipartimento di Scienze Agronomiche e Genetica Vegetale Agraria, Università degli Studi di Sassari, Italien
  • Roberto Papa, aDipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari ed Ambientali, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Italien
Knowledge about the origins and evolution of crop species represents an important prerequisite for efficient conservation and use of existing plant materials. This study was designed to solve the ongoing debate on the origins of the common bean by investigating the nucleotide diversity at five gene loci of a large sample that represents the entire geographical distribution of the wild forms of this species. Our data clearly indicate a Mesoamerican origin of the common bean. They also strongly support the occurrence of a bottleneck during the formation of the Andean gene pool that predates the domestication, which was suggested by recent studies based on multilocus molecular markers. Furthermore, a remarkable result was the genetic structure that was seen for the Mesoamerican accessions, with the identification of four different genetic groups that have different relationships with the sets of wild accessions from the Andes and northern Peru-Ecuador. This finding implies that both of the gene pools from South America originated through different migration events from the Mesoamerican populations that were characteristic of central Mexico.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol/bind109
Nummer14
Sider (fra-til)E788-96
Antal sider9
ISSN0027-8424
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 3 apr. 2012

Se relationer på Aarhus Universitet Citationsformater

ID: 52365769