Mental Health Conditions in Partners and Adult Children of Stroke Survivors

Nils Skajaa*, Dóra Körmendiné Farkas, Kristina Laugesen, Cecilia Hvitfeldt Fuglsang, Victor W. Henderson, Oleguer Plana-Ripoll, David Gaist, Henrik Toft Sørensen

*Corresponding author af dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Abstract

Importance: Family caregiving after critical illness has been associated with several adverse health outcomes, including various aspects of mental health, but research focusing specifically on family members of stroke survivors is limited. Objectives: To examine the associations of stroke in a partner or parent with the risk of depression, substance use disorders, anxiety disorders, and self-harm or suicide. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nationwide, population-based cohort study used data from Danish nationwide administrative and clinical registries (2004-2021). Participants included partners and adult children of survivors of stroke. Data analysis was performed from March to December 2023. Exposure: Having a partner or parent who survived stroke. Main Outcomes and Measures: The Aalen-Johansen estimator was used to compute propensity score-weighted 3-year absolute risks, risk differences, and risk ratios for depression, substance use disorders, anxiety disorders, and self-harm or suicide among partners or children of survivors of stroke compared with partners or children of survivors of myocardial infarction (MI) and matched individuals from the general population. Results: The study included a total of 1923732 individuals: 70917 partners of stroke survivors (median [IQR] age, 68 [59-76] years; 46369 women [65%]), 70664 partners of MI survivors (median [IQR] age, 65 [55-73] years; 51849 women [73%]), 354570 partners of individuals from the general population (median [IQR] age, 68 [59-76] years; 231833 women [65%]), 207386 adult children of stroke survivors (median [IQR] age, 45 [36-52] years; 99382 women [48%]), 183309 adult children of MI survivors (median [IQR] age, 42 [33-49] years; 88078 women [48%]), and 1036886 adult children of individuals from the general population (median [IQR] age, 45 [36-52] years; 496875 women [48%]). Baseline characteristics were well balanced across cohorts after propensity score weighting. Among partners of stroke survivors, the 3-year absolute risk was 1.0% for depression, 0.7% for substance use disorders, 0.3% for anxiety disorders, and 0.04% for self-harm or suicide. Risk ratio point estimates for the assessed outcomes ranged from 1.14 to 1.42 compared with the general population and from 1.04 to 1.09 compared with partners of MI survivors. The elevated risk of depression in partners of stroke survivors was more pronounced after severe or moderate stroke than after mild stroke. Among adult children of stroke survivors, the 3-year absolute risk was 0.6% for depression, 0.6% for substance use disorders, 0.2% for anxiety disorders, and 0.05% for self-harm or suicide. Both absolute risks and risk ratios for adult children of stroke survivors were smaller than those reported in the partner analyses. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of partners and adult children of stroke survivors, risks of several mental health conditions and self-harm or suicide were moderately higher compared with the general population and, to a lesser extent, partners and adult children of MI survivors. These findings highlight the potential consequences of stroke among family members, particularly partners, and its findings may possibly serve as a quantitative foundation for the development of future stroke rehabilitation services.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
ArtikelnummerE243286
TidsskriftJAMA network open
Vol/bind7
Nummer3
ISSN2574-3805
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 14 mar. 2024

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