Maternal reproductive history and premenopausal risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease: a Danish cohort study

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DOI

  • Shannon X Chen, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.
  • ,
  • Kathleen M Rasmussen, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.
  • ,
  • Julia Finkelstein, Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.
  • ,
  • H Støvring
  • Ellen Aa Nøhr, Department of Clinical Research, the Research Unit of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Helene Kirkegaard, Department of Clinical Research, the Research Unit of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark hkirkegaard@health.sdu.dk.

OBJECTIVES: The metabolic changes of pregnancy resemble a cardiovascular risk profile and may persist postpartum, with body mass index (BMI) as a potential modifier. We examined the association between the number of live-birth pregnancies and maternal premenopausal risks of hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD), accounting for pre-pregnancy BMI as well as abortions and stillbirths.

DESIGN: A prospective cohort study.

SETTING: Mothers from the Danish National Birth Cohort (1996 to 2002). For each of these women, registry data on all pregnancies from 1973 to 2011 were obtained, as were self-reported pre-pregnancy weight and height.

PARTICIPANTS: A total of 44 552 first-time mothers in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

OUTCOME MEASURES: Risks of hypertension and CVD during and between live-birth pregnancies separately and combined as live-birth cycles.

RESULTS: After adjustment for abortions, stillbirths, pre-pregnancy BMI and other covariates, a higher risk of hypertension was observed in the first (HR 1.53, 95% CI: 1.37 to 1.72) and fourth and subsequent live-birth cycles (HR 1.72, 95% CI: 1.15 to 2.58), compared with the second. However, as number of live-birth pregnancies increased, risk of hypertension decreased during live-birth pregnancies and increased between live-birth pregnancies (tests for trend, p<0.01). For CVD, we found an overall J-shaped but non-significant association with number of live-birth pregnancies. No interaction with pre-pregnancy BMI (<25 versus ≥25 kg/m2) was observed.

CONCLUSIONS: Premenopausal women had the highest risk of hypertension and CVD during their first live-birth pregnancy and after their fourth live-birth pregnancy. All risks were independent of BMI before the first live-birth pregnancy and of number of abortions and stillbirths.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummere030702
TidsskriftBMJ Open
Vol/bind9
Nummer11
ISSN2044-6055
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 4 nov. 2019

Bibliografisk note

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

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