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Klinefelter syndrome and testosterone treatment: a national cohort study on thrombosis risk

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OBJECTIVES: Klinefelter syndrome (KS), 47,XXY, can be viewed as a disease model for investigating the risk of thrombosis in male hypogonadism and the subsequent risk related to testosterone treatment. We describe rates of thrombotic risk factors, thrombosis and thrombosis mortality in KS and the association with testosterone treatment.

METHODS: National registry-based matched cohort study with follow-up from 1995-2016 set in Denmark. 1155 men with KS were each matched by year and month of birth to 100 men from the background population. First thrombotic events and thrombosis mortality was evaluated by event rates and hazard ratios (HR) and applying testosterone treatment as a time-dependent covariate.

RESULTS: The KS cohort had higher incidence of venous thromboembolism relative to the comparison cohort (HR, 3.95; 95 % CI, 2.83-5.52). Total thrombotic deaths were increased in KS (HR, 1.76; 95 % CI, 1.18-2.62), and all-cause mortality was increased in KS following arterial thrombosis (HR 1.73; 95 % CI 1.22-2.47). Only 48.7% of men with KS redeemed prescriptions for testosterone. Untreated men with KS were on average born twelve years before those treated, and the majority of untreated men with KS with available biochemistry were hypogonadal. Testosterone treatment in KS was associated with a non-significant decrease in venous thromboembolism and thrombotic deaths.

CONCLUSION: Thrombosis and thrombotic deaths are increased in KS. Only half of men with KS ever received testosterone treatment, despite overt hypogonadism in the non-treated. Testosterone treatment in Klinefelter syndrome was insignificantly associated with lower incidence rates of venous thrombosis and thrombotic deaths.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEndocrine Connections
Vol/bind9
Nummer1
Sider (fra-til)34-43
Antal sider10
ISSN2049-3614
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2020

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