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Key questions in marine mammal bioenergetics

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  • Elizabeth A. McHuron, University of Washington
  • ,
  • Stephanie Adamczak, University of California at Santa Cruz
  • ,
  • John P.Y. Arnould, Deakin University, School of Life and Environmental Sciences
  • ,
  • Erin Ashe, Oceans Initiative
  • ,
  • Cormac Booth, University of St Andrews
  • ,
  • W. Don Bowen, Dalhousie University, Faculty of Medicine, Bedford Institute of Oceanography
  • ,
  • Fredrik Christiansen, Murdoch University
  • ,
  • Magda Chudzinska, University of St Andrews
  • ,
  • Daniel P. Costa, University of California at Santa Cruz
  • ,
  • Andreas Fahlman, Fundación Oceanogràfic de la Comunitat Valenciana, Kolmården Wildlife Park
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  • Nicholas A. Farmer, NOAA
  • ,
  • Sarah M.E. Fortune, Dalhousie University
  • ,
  • Cara A. Gallagher, University of Potsdam
  • ,
  • Kelly A. Keen, University of California at Santa Cruz
  • ,
  • Peter T. Madsen
  • Clive R. McMahon, Sydney Institute of Marine Science
  • ,
  • Jacob Nabe-Nielsen
  • Dawn P. Noren, NOAA
  • ,
  • Shawn R. Noren, University of California at Santa Cruz
  • ,
  • Enrico Pirotta, University of St Andrews
  • ,
  • David A.S. Rosen, University of British Columbia
  • ,
  • Cassie N. Speakman, Deakin University, School of Life and Environmental Sciences
  • ,
  • Stella Villegas-Amtmann, University of California at Santa Cruz
  • ,
  • Rob Williams, Oceans Initiative

Bioenergetic approaches are increasingly used to understand how marine mammal populations could be affected by a changing and disturbed aquatic environment. There remain considerable gaps in our knowledge of marine mammal bioenergetics, which hinder the application of bioenergetic studies to inform policy decisions. We conducted a priority-setting exercise to identify high-priority unanswered questions in marine mammal bioenergetics, with an emphasis on questions relevant to conservation and management. Electronic communication and a virtual workshop were used to solicit and collate potential research questions from the marine mammal bioenergetic community. From a final list of 39 questions, 11 were identified as 'key' questions because they received votes from at least 50% of survey participants. Key questions included those related to energy intake (prey landscapes, exposure to human activities) and expenditure (field metabolic rate, exposure to human activities, lactation, time-activity budgets), energy allocation priorities, metrics of body condition and relationships with survival and reproductive success and extrapolation of data from one species to another. Existing tools to address key questions include labelled water, animal-borne sensors, mark-resight data from long-term research programs, environmental DNA and unmanned vehicles. Further validation of existing approaches and development of new methodologies are needed to comprehensively address some key questions, particularly for cetaceans. The identification of these key questions can provide a guiding framework to set research priorities, which ultimately may yield more accurate information to inform policies and better conserve marine mammal populations.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummercoac055
TidsskriftConservation Physiology
Vol/bind10
Nummer1
Antal sider17
ISSN2051-1434
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2022

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