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Jurisdiction Size and Local Government Effectiveness: Assessing the Effects of Municipal Amalgamations on Performance

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Jurisdiction Size and Local Government Effectiveness : Assessing the Effects of Municipal Amalgamations on Performance. / Blom-Hansen, Jens; Houlberg, Kurt; Serritzlew, Søren.

I: European Journal of Political Research, Bind 60, Nr. 1, 02.2021, s. 153-174.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{6eb1ffbc4c974f1ba1fa22e5acb972ea,
title = "Jurisdiction Size and Local Government Effectiveness: Assessing the Effects of Municipal Amalgamations on Performance",
abstract = "The optimal jurisdiction size has been debated since Plato and Aristotle. A large literature has studied economic and democratic scale effects, but we have almost no knowledge of the effects of jurisdiction size on the effectiveness of local services. This is due to two methodological problems. First, selection bias and reverse causality often render change in jurisdiction size an endogenous variable. Second, there is a lack of empirical indicators of effectiveness, and most studies therefore focus on spending measures. Extant research thus studies economies of scale, leaving effectiveness of scale unexamined. We address both problems in a quasi‐experimental study of public schools. Our findings from the school area indicate that jurisdiction size does not have systematic effects on effectiveness. Our analysis therefore supports recent studies of economic and democratic scale effects that indicate that the search for the optimal jurisdiction size is futile.",
author = "Jens Blom-Hansen and Kurt Houlberg and S{\o}ren Serritzlew",
year = "2021",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1111/1475-6765.12394",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "153--174",
journal = "European Journal of Political Research",
issn = "0304-4130",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Jurisdiction Size and Local Government Effectiveness

T2 - Assessing the Effects of Municipal Amalgamations on Performance

AU - Blom-Hansen, Jens

AU - Houlberg, Kurt

AU - Serritzlew, Søren

PY - 2021/2

Y1 - 2021/2

N2 - The optimal jurisdiction size has been debated since Plato and Aristotle. A large literature has studied economic and democratic scale effects, but we have almost no knowledge of the effects of jurisdiction size on the effectiveness of local services. This is due to two methodological problems. First, selection bias and reverse causality often render change in jurisdiction size an endogenous variable. Second, there is a lack of empirical indicators of effectiveness, and most studies therefore focus on spending measures. Extant research thus studies economies of scale, leaving effectiveness of scale unexamined. We address both problems in a quasi‐experimental study of public schools. Our findings from the school area indicate that jurisdiction size does not have systematic effects on effectiveness. Our analysis therefore supports recent studies of economic and democratic scale effects that indicate that the search for the optimal jurisdiction size is futile.

AB - The optimal jurisdiction size has been debated since Plato and Aristotle. A large literature has studied economic and democratic scale effects, but we have almost no knowledge of the effects of jurisdiction size on the effectiveness of local services. This is due to two methodological problems. First, selection bias and reverse causality often render change in jurisdiction size an endogenous variable. Second, there is a lack of empirical indicators of effectiveness, and most studies therefore focus on spending measures. Extant research thus studies economies of scale, leaving effectiveness of scale unexamined. We address both problems in a quasi‐experimental study of public schools. Our findings from the school area indicate that jurisdiction size does not have systematic effects on effectiveness. Our analysis therefore supports recent studies of economic and democratic scale effects that indicate that the search for the optimal jurisdiction size is futile.

U2 - 10.1111/1475-6765.12394

DO - 10.1111/1475-6765.12394

M3 - Journal article

VL - 60

SP - 153

EP - 174

JO - European Journal of Political Research

JF - European Journal of Political Research

SN - 0304-4130

IS - 1

ER -