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"It was great to break down the walls between patient and provider": liminality in a co-produced advisory course for psychiatry residents

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  • Sacha Agrawal, Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Centre for Addiction & Mental Health - Canada, University of Toronto, Campbell Family Mental Hlth Inst
  • ,
  • Csilla Kalocsai, Univ Toronto, University of Toronto, University Health Network Toronto, Univ Hlth Network, Wilson Ctr Res Educ
  • ,
  • Pat Capponi, Voices St
  • ,
  • Sean Kidd, Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Centre for Addiction & Mental Health - Canada, University of Toronto, Campbell Family Mental Hlth Inst
  • ,
  • Charlotte Ringsted
  • David Wiljer, Univ Hlth Network, University of Toronto, University Health Network Toronto
  • ,
  • Sophie Soklaridis, Univ Toronto, University of Toronto, University Health Network Toronto, Univ Hlth Network, Wilson Ctr Res Educ

Although rhetoric abounds about the importance of patient-, person- and relationship-centered approaches to health care, little is known about how to address the problem of dehumanization through medical and health professions education. One promising but under-theorized strategy is to co-produce education in collaboration with health service users. To this end, we co-produced a longitudinal course in psychiatry that paired people with lived experience of mental health challenges as advisors to fourth-year psychiatry residents at the University of Toronto. The goal of this study was to examine this novel, relationship-based course in order to understand co-produced health professions education more broadly. Using qualitative interviews with residents and advisors after the first iteration of the course, we explored how participants made meaning of the course and of what learning, if any, occurred, for whom and how. We found that the anthropological theory of liminality allowed us to understand participants' complex experiences and illuminated how this type of pedagogy may work to achieve its effects. Liminality also helped us understand why some participants resisted the course, and how we could more carefully think about co-produced, humanistic education and transformative learning.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAdvances in Health Sciences Education
Vol/bind26
Nummer2
Sider (fra-til)385-403
Antal sider19
ISSN1382-4996
DOI
StatusUdgivet - maj 2021

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