Institut for Forretningsudvikling og Teknologi

It starts at home? Climate policies targeting household consumption and behavioral decisions are key to low-carbon futures

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  • Ghislain Dubois, TEC Conseil
  • ,
  • Benjamin Sovacool
  • Carlo Aall, Western Norway Research Institute
  • ,
  • Maria Nilsson, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
  • ,
  • Carine Barbier, Centre International de Recherche sur l’Environnement et le Développement
  • ,
  • Alina Herrmann, HIT, University Hospital, Heidelberg
  • ,
  • Sébastien Bruyère, TEC Conseil
  • ,
  • Camilla Andersson, Clinical Sciences, Umea universitet, Klinisk vetenskap.
  • ,
  • Bore Skold, Clinical Sciences, Umea universitet, Klinisk vetenskap.
  • ,
  • Franck Nadaud, Centre International de Recherche sur l’Environnement et le Développement
  • ,
  • Florian Dorner, HIT, University Hospital, Heidelberg
  • ,
  • Karen Richardsen Moberg, Western Norway Research Institute
  • ,
  • Jean Paul Ceron, TEC Conseil
  • ,
  • Helen Fischer, University of Heidelberg
  • ,
  • Dorothee Amelung, University of Heidelberg
  • ,
  • Marta Baltruszewicz, Leeds University
  • ,
  • Jeremy Fischer, TEC Conseil
  • ,
  • Françoise Benevise, TEC Conseil
  • ,
  • Valérie R. Louis, University of Heidelberg
  • ,
  • Rainer Sauerborn, HIT, University Hospital, Heidelberg

Through their consumption behavior, households are responsible for 72% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Thus, they are key actors in reaching the 1.5 °C goal under the Paris Agreement. However, the possible contribution and position of households in climate policies is neither well understood, nor do households receive sufficiently high priority in current climate policy strategies. This paper investigates how behavioral change can achieve a substantial reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in European high-income countries. It uses theoretical thinking and some core results from the HOPE research project, which investigated household preferences for reducing emissions in four European cities in France, Germany, Norway and Sweden. The paper makes five major points: First, car and plane mobility, meat and dairy consumption, as well as heating are the most dominant components of household footprints. Second, household living situations (demographics, size of home) greatly influence the household potential to reduce their footprint, even more than country or city location. Third, household decisions can be sequential and temporally dynamic, shifting through different phases such as childhood, adulthood, and illness. Fourth, short term voluntary efforts will not be sufficient by themselves to reach the drastic reductions needed to achieve the 1.5 °C goal; instead, households need a regulatory framework supporting their behavioral changes. Fifth, there is a mismatch between the roles and responsibilities conveyed by current climate policies and household perceptions of responsibility. We then conclude with further recommendations for research and policy.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEnergy Research and Social Science
Vol/bind52
NummerJune
Sider (fra-til)144-158
Antal sider15
ISSN2214-6296
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2019

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