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Invasion impacts and dynamics of a European-wide introduced species

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  • Phillip J. Haubrock, Forschungsinstitut Senckenberg, University of South Bohemia
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  • Danish A. Ahmed, Gulf University for Science and Technology
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  • Ross N. Cuthbert, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Queen's University Belfast
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  • Rachel Stubbington, Nottingham Trent University
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  • Sami Domisch, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
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  • Jaime R.G. Marquez, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
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  • Ayah Beidas, Gulf University for Science and Technology
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  • Giuseppe Amatulli, Yale University
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  • Jens Kiesel, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Kiel University
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  • Longzhu Q. Shen, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Carnegie Mellon University
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  • Ismael Soto, University of South Bohemia
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  • David G. Angeler, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
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  • Núria Bonada, University of Barcelona
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  • Miguel Cañedo-Argüelles, University of Barcelona
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  • Zoltán Csabai, University of Pecs, Masaryk University
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  • Thibault Datry, Irstea
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  • Elvira de Eyto, Marine Institute
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  • Alain Dohet, Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology
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  • Emma Drohan, Dundalk Institute of Technology
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  • Judy England, Environment Agency
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  • Maria J. Feio, University of Coimbra
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  • Marie A.E. Forio, Ghent University
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  • Peter Goethals, Ghent University
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  • Wolfram Graf, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
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  • Jani Heino, Finnish Environment Institute
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  • Emma J. Hudgins, Carleton University
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  • Sonja C. Jähnig, Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Humboldt University of Berlin
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  • Richard K. Johnson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
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  • Aitor Larrañaga, University of the Basque Country
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  • Patrick Leitner, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
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  • Lionel L'Hoste, Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology
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  • Marie Helene Lizee, UMR Herbivores
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  • Anthony Maire, Electricite de France
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  • Jes J. Rasmussen, Norwegian Institute for Water Research
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  • Ralf B. Schäfer, University of Koblenz-Landau
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  • Astrid Schmidt-Kloiber, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
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  • Rudy Vannevel, Flanders Environment Agency
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  • Gábor Várbíró, Centre for Ecological Research
  • ,
  • Peter Wiberg-Larsen
  • Peter Haase, Forschungsinstitut Senckenberg, University of Duisburg-Essen

Globalization has led to the introduction of thousands of alien species worldwide. With growing impacts by invasive species, understanding the invasion process remains critical for predicting adverse effects and informing efficient management. Theoretically, invasion dynamics have been assumed to follow an “invasion curve” (S-shaped curve of available area invaded over time), but this dynamic has lacked empirical testing using large-scale data and neglects to consider invader abundances. We propose an “impact curve” describing the impacts generated by invasive species over time based on cumulative abundances. To test this curve's large-scale applicability, we used the data-rich New Zealand mud snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum, one of the most damaging freshwater invaders that has invaded almost all of Europe. Using long-term (1979–2020) abundance and environmental data collected across 306 European sites, we observed that P. antipodarum abundance generally increased through time, with slower population growth at higher latitudes and with lower runoff depth. Fifty-nine percent of these populations followed the impact curve, characterized by first occurrence, exponential growth, then long-term saturation. This behaviour is consistent with boom-bust dynamics, as saturation occurs due to a rapid decline in abundance over time. Across sites, we estimated that impact peaked approximately two decades after first detection, but the rate of progression along the invasion process was influenced by local abiotic conditions. The S-shaped impact curve may be common among many invasive species that undergo complex invasion dynamics. This provides a potentially unifying approach to advance understanding of large-scale invasion dynamics and could inform timely management actions to mitigate impacts on ecosystems and economies.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftGlobal Change Biology
Vol/bind28
Nummer15
Sider (fra-til)4620-4632
Antal sider13
ISSN1354-1013
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2022

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
We thank Paride Balzani (University of Florence, Italy), Francesco J. Oficialdegui (Doñana Biological Station (CSIC)), and Franck Courchamp (University Paris-Saclay) for comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. We also thank the Yale Centre for Research Computing for guidance and use of the research computing infrastructure. D.A.A. is funded by the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences (KFAS) (PR1914SM-01) and the Gulf University for Science and Technology (GUST) internal seed funds (Case no. 234597 & 253536). R.N.C. acknowledges funding from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and Leverhulme Trust (ECF-2021-001). S.D. and S.C.J. acknowledge funding by the Leibniz Competition (J45/2018, P74/20). S.D. and S.C.J acknowledge support by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF; 033W034A). P.J.H. and P.H. received funding from the EU Horizon 2020 project eLTER PLUS (Grant Agreement No. 871128). Open Access funding enabled and organized by Projekt DEAL.

Funding Information:
We thank Paride Balzani (University of Florence, Italy), Francesco J. Oficialdegui (Doñana Biological Station (CSIC)), and Franck Courchamp (University Paris‐Saclay) for comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. We also thank the Yale Centre for Research Computing for guidance and use of the research computing infrastructure. D.A.A. is funded by the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences (KFAS) (PR1914SM‐01) and the Gulf University for Science and Technology (GUST) internal seed funds (Case no. 234597 & 253536). R.N.C. acknowledges funding from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and Leverhulme Trust (ECF‐2021‐001). S.D. and S.C.J. acknowledge funding by the Leibniz Competition (J45/2018, P74/20). S.D. and S.C.J acknowledge support by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF; 033W034A). P.J.H. and P.H. received funding from the EU Horizon 2020 project eLTER PLUS (Grant Agreement No. 871128). Open Access funding enabled and organized by Projekt DEAL.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors. Global Change Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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