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Internet-delivered Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial

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Internet-delivered Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors : A randomized controlled trial. / Nissen, Eva Rames; O'Connor, Maja; Kaldo, Viktor; Højris, Inger; Borre, Michael; Zachariae, Robert; Mehlsen, Mimi.

I: Psycho-Oncology, Bind 29, Nr. 1, 01.2020, s. 68-75.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{3f375a4df03e481791d22780c620d1b8,
title = "Internet-delivered Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors: A randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Internet-delivered interventions may alleviate distress in cancer survivors with limited access to psychological face-to-face treatment. In collaboration with a group of cancer survivors, we developed and tested the efficacy of a therapist-assisted internet-delivered mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (iMBCT) program for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors.METHODS: A total of 1282 cancer survivors were screened for anxiety and depression during their routine oncology follow-up; eligible breast (n=137) and prostate cancer (n=13) survivors were randomized to iMBCT or CAU-waitlist. Primary outcomes of anxiety and depression were assessed at baseline, 5 weeks, 10 weeks (post-intervention), and 6 months.RESULTS: Significant effects were found for both anxiety (Cohen's d=0.45; p=0.017) and depressive symptoms (d=0.42; p=0.024) post-intervention. The effects were maintained at follow-up for anxiety (d=0.40; p=0.029), but not for depressive symptoms (d=0.28; p=0.131).CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary findings suggest iMBCT to be a helpful intervention for cancer survivors suffering from symptoms of anxiety. Further studies on the efficacy for symptoms of depression are needed.",
keywords = "anxiety, breast cancer, cancer, cancer survivors, cognitive therapy, depressive symptoms, internet, mindfulness, oncology, prostate cancer",
author = "Nissen, {Eva Rames} and Maja O'Connor and Viktor Kaldo and Inger H{\o}jris and Michael Borre and Robert Zachariae and Mimi Mehlsen",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2019 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2020",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1002/pon.5237",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "68--75",
journal = "Psycho-Oncology",
issn = "1057-9249",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Internet-delivered Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors

T2 - A randomized controlled trial

AU - Nissen, Eva Rames

AU - O'Connor, Maja

AU - Kaldo, Viktor

AU - Højris, Inger

AU - Borre, Michael

AU - Zachariae, Robert

AU - Mehlsen, Mimi

N1 - © 2019 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2020/1

Y1 - 2020/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Internet-delivered interventions may alleviate distress in cancer survivors with limited access to psychological face-to-face treatment. In collaboration with a group of cancer survivors, we developed and tested the efficacy of a therapist-assisted internet-delivered mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (iMBCT) program for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors.METHODS: A total of 1282 cancer survivors were screened for anxiety and depression during their routine oncology follow-up; eligible breast (n=137) and prostate cancer (n=13) survivors were randomized to iMBCT or CAU-waitlist. Primary outcomes of anxiety and depression were assessed at baseline, 5 weeks, 10 weeks (post-intervention), and 6 months.RESULTS: Significant effects were found for both anxiety (Cohen's d=0.45; p=0.017) and depressive symptoms (d=0.42; p=0.024) post-intervention. The effects were maintained at follow-up for anxiety (d=0.40; p=0.029), but not for depressive symptoms (d=0.28; p=0.131).CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary findings suggest iMBCT to be a helpful intervention for cancer survivors suffering from symptoms of anxiety. Further studies on the efficacy for symptoms of depression are needed.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Internet-delivered interventions may alleviate distress in cancer survivors with limited access to psychological face-to-face treatment. In collaboration with a group of cancer survivors, we developed and tested the efficacy of a therapist-assisted internet-delivered mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (iMBCT) program for anxiety and depression in cancer survivors.METHODS: A total of 1282 cancer survivors were screened for anxiety and depression during their routine oncology follow-up; eligible breast (n=137) and prostate cancer (n=13) survivors were randomized to iMBCT or CAU-waitlist. Primary outcomes of anxiety and depression were assessed at baseline, 5 weeks, 10 weeks (post-intervention), and 6 months.RESULTS: Significant effects were found for both anxiety (Cohen's d=0.45; p=0.017) and depressive symptoms (d=0.42; p=0.024) post-intervention. The effects were maintained at follow-up for anxiety (d=0.40; p=0.029), but not for depressive symptoms (d=0.28; p=0.131).CONCLUSIONS: Our preliminary findings suggest iMBCT to be a helpful intervention for cancer survivors suffering from symptoms of anxiety. Further studies on the efficacy for symptoms of depression are needed.

KW - anxiety

KW - breast cancer

KW - cancer

KW - cancer survivors

KW - cognitive therapy

KW - depressive symptoms

KW - internet

KW - mindfulness

KW - oncology

KW - prostate cancer

U2 - 10.1002/pon.5237

DO - 10.1002/pon.5237

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31600414

VL - 29

SP - 68

EP - 75

JO - Psycho-Oncology

JF - Psycho-Oncology

SN - 1057-9249

IS - 1

ER -