Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ethylene plant defense pathways

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Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ethylene plant defense pathways. / Mur, Luis A J; Prats, Elena; Pierre, Sandra; Hall, Michael A; Hebelstrup, Kim.

I: Frontiers in Plant Science, Bind 4, Nr. 215, 06.2013.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Mur, Luis A J ; Prats, Elena ; Pierre, Sandra ; Hall, Michael A ; Hebelstrup, Kim. / Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ethylene plant defense pathways. I: Frontiers in Plant Science. 2013 ; Bind 4, Nr. 215.

Bibtex

@article{5b7f4c9b0026486880bff03f35eb8caf,
title = "Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ethylene plant defense pathways",
abstract = "Plant defence against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defence responses to be tailored to particular biotic stresses. Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a major signal influencing resistance mediated by both signalling pathways but no attempt has been made to integrate NO into established SA/JA/ET interactions. NO has been shown to act as an inducer or suppressor of signalling along each pathway. NO will initiate SA biosynthesis and nitrosylate key cysteines on TGA-class transcription factors to aid in the initiation of SA—dependent gene expression. Against this, S-nitrosylation of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1) will promote the NPR1 oligomerisation within the cytoplasm to reduce TGA activation. In JA biosynthesis, NO will initiate the expression of JA biosynthetic enzymes, presumably to over-come any antagonistic effects of SA on JA-mediated transcription. NO will also initiate the expression of ET biosynthetic genes but a suppressive role is also observed in the S –nitrosylation and inhibition of s-adenosylmethionine transferases which provides methyl groups for ethylene production. Based on these data a model for NO action is proposed but we have also highlighted the need to understand when and how inductive and suppressive steps are used.",
keywords = "nitric oxide, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylenes, pathogens, resistance mechanisms, signaling pathways",
author = "Mur, {Luis A J} and Elena Prats and Sandra Pierre and Hall, {Michael A} and Kim Hebelstrup",
year = "2013",
month = "6",
doi = "10.3389/fpls.2013.00215",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
journal = "Frontiers in Plant Science",
issn = "1664-462X",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A",
number = "215",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Integrating nitric oxide into salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ethylene plant defense pathways

AU - Mur, Luis A J

AU - Prats, Elena

AU - Pierre, Sandra

AU - Hall, Michael A

AU - Hebelstrup, Kim

PY - 2013/6

Y1 - 2013/6

N2 - Plant defence against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defence responses to be tailored to particular biotic stresses. Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a major signal influencing resistance mediated by both signalling pathways but no attempt has been made to integrate NO into established SA/JA/ET interactions. NO has been shown to act as an inducer or suppressor of signalling along each pathway. NO will initiate SA biosynthesis and nitrosylate key cysteines on TGA-class transcription factors to aid in the initiation of SA—dependent gene expression. Against this, S-nitrosylation of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1) will promote the NPR1 oligomerisation within the cytoplasm to reduce TGA activation. In JA biosynthesis, NO will initiate the expression of JA biosynthetic enzymes, presumably to over-come any antagonistic effects of SA on JA-mediated transcription. NO will also initiate the expression of ET biosynthetic genes but a suppressive role is also observed in the S –nitrosylation and inhibition of s-adenosylmethionine transferases which provides methyl groups for ethylene production. Based on these data a model for NO action is proposed but we have also highlighted the need to understand when and how inductive and suppressive steps are used.

AB - Plant defence against pests and pathogens is known to be conferred by either salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET) pathways, depending on infection or herbivore-grazing strategy. It is well attested that SA and JA/ET pathways are mutually antagonistic allowing defence responses to be tailored to particular biotic stresses. Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a major signal influencing resistance mediated by both signalling pathways but no attempt has been made to integrate NO into established SA/JA/ET interactions. NO has been shown to act as an inducer or suppressor of signalling along each pathway. NO will initiate SA biosynthesis and nitrosylate key cysteines on TGA-class transcription factors to aid in the initiation of SA—dependent gene expression. Against this, S-nitrosylation of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1) will promote the NPR1 oligomerisation within the cytoplasm to reduce TGA activation. In JA biosynthesis, NO will initiate the expression of JA biosynthetic enzymes, presumably to over-come any antagonistic effects of SA on JA-mediated transcription. NO will also initiate the expression of ET biosynthetic genes but a suppressive role is also observed in the S –nitrosylation and inhibition of s-adenosylmethionine transferases which provides methyl groups for ethylene production. Based on these data a model for NO action is proposed but we have also highlighted the need to understand when and how inductive and suppressive steps are used.

KW - nitric oxide

KW - salicylic acid

KW - jasmonic acid

KW - ethylenes

KW - pathogens

KW - resistance mechanisms

KW - signaling pathways

U2 - 10.3389/fpls.2013.00215

DO - 10.3389/fpls.2013.00215

M3 - Journal article

VL - 4

JO - Frontiers in Plant Science

JF - Frontiers in Plant Science

SN - 1664-462X

IS - 215

ER -