Insomnia associated with traffic noise and proximity to traffic: a cross-sectional study of the Respiratory Health in Northern Europe III population

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DOI

  • Emma Janson, Uppsala Universitet
  • ,
  • Ane Johannessen, Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, NO-5021 Bergen, Norway. tor.aasen@helse-bergen.no.
  • ,
  • Mathias Holm, Gøteborg Transplantationscenter, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset
  • ,
  • Karl Franklin, Clinical Sciences, Umea universitet, Klinisk vetenskap.
  • ,
  • Gitte Juel Holst
  • ,
  • Thorarinn Gislason, National University Hospital Reykjavik
  • ,
  • Rain Jögi, Tartu University Clinics
  • ,
  • Eva Lindberg, Uppsala Universitet
  • ,
  • Magnus Svartengren, Uppsala Universitet
  • ,
  • Christer Janson, Uppsala Universitet

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Exposure to traffic noise increases the risk of sleeping disturbance, but little is known about the effect of traffic-related air pollution on insomnia symptoms. We aimed to investigate the separate associations of self-reported proximity to traffic and traffic noise with insomnia. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of the population included in the Respiratory Health in Northern Europe study, consisting of randomly selected men and women born between 1945 and 1973, from 7 Northern European centers. Hearing traffic noise in the bedroom, bedroom window proximity to traffic, and insomnia symptoms were self-reported. Bedroom window proximity to traffic was used as a surrogate for exposure to traffic-related air pollution. The following insomnia symptoms were assessed: difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, and early morning awakening. RESULTS: A total of 12,963 individuals was included. Traffic noise was positively associated with all three insomnia symptoms: difficulty initiating sleep (odds ratio [OR] = 3.54; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.85, 6.76), difficulty maintaining sleep (OR = 2.95; 95% CI: 1.62, 5.37), and early morning awakening (OR = 3.25; 95% CI: 1.97, 5.37). Proximity to traffic without disturbing noise was associated with difficulty initiating sleep (OR = 1.62; 95% CI: 1.45, 1.82). CONCLUSIONS: This study adds further support to the identification of traffic noise as a risk factor for insomnia. Proximity to traffic without being exposed to noise was associated with an increased risk of difficulty initiating sleep. Our findings indicate that insomnia may be associated with both traffic noise and traffic-related air pollution.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Vol/bind16
Nummer4
Sider (fra-til)545-552
Antal sider8
ISSN1550-9389
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2020

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