Indirect Genetic Effects for group-housed animals

Publikation: Bog/antologi/afhandling/rapportPh.d.-afhandling

  • Setegn Worku Alemu, Wageningen University, Danmark
This thesis investigated social interactions in group-housed animals. The main findings of this thesis: 1) Statistical methods to estimate indirect genetic effects when interactions differ between kin vs. non-kin were developed. 2) Indirect genetic effects contribute a substantial amount of heritable variation for bite mark traits in group-housed min. 3) Indirect genetic effects estimation needs to take into account systematic interactions due to sex or kin for bite mark trait in group-housed min. 4) Genomic selection can be used to increase the response to selection for survival time in Brown layers
OriginalsprogEngelsk
ForlagAarhus University, Faculty of Science and Technology
Antal sider228
ISBN (Trykt)978-87-93176-71-3
StatusUdgivet - 3 jun. 2015

Note vedr. afhandling

During his PhD, Setegn investigated social interactions in group-housed animals. Social interaction may reduce the productivity and welfare of animals. For example, social interactions lead to bite marks in group-housed mink, and to cannibalism in laying hens. In his thesis, Setegn investigated whether genetic selection with social genetic effects can reduce bite marks in group-housed mink and whether genomic selection can be used to increase the response to selection for survival time in brown layer showing cannibalistic behavior. The results show that social genetic effects contribute a substantial amount of heritable variation for bite mark trait in group-housed mink, so that total genetic variance is large and the response to genomic selection was substantially higher for brown layer showing cannibalistic behavior.
These findings indicate there are good prospects to produce mink that have a low level of biting, and to produce laying hens that show little cannibalism.

The PhD degree was completed jointly under the auspices of the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Science and Technology, Aarhus University and Wageningen Institute of Animal Sciences (WIAS), Wageningen University.

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