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How corporatist institutions shape the access of citizen groups to policy makers: Evidence from Denmark and Switzerland

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How corporatist institutions shape the access of citizen groups to policy makers : Evidence from Denmark and Switzerland. / Christiansen, Peter Munk; Mach, André; Varone, Frédéric.

I: Journal of European Public Policy, Bind 25, Nr. 4, 03.04.2018, s. 526-545.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Christiansen, Peter Munk ; Mach, André ; Varone, Frédéric. / How corporatist institutions shape the access of citizen groups to policy makers : Evidence from Denmark and Switzerland. I: Journal of European Public Policy. 2018 ; Bind 25, Nr. 4. s. 526-545.

Bibtex

@article{644aae58ce1f436cad2e9421166c1b4f,
title = "How corporatist institutions shape the access of citizen groups to policy makers: Evidence from Denmark and Switzerland",
abstract = "Traditional corporatist groups such as business groups and unions still play an important role in many countries, and the rumors exaggerate the decline of corporatist structures. Nevertheless citizen groups have grown in number and political importance. The authors show that Danish and Swiss citizen groups have gained better access to the administrative and parliamentary venues in the period 1975–1985 through 2010, but with Swiss citizen groups more successful than their Danish counterparts, particularly with regard to the parliamentary venue. Danish and Swiss neo-corporatism has confronted similar socio-economic and political challenges during this period, but the political opportunity structure is more favorable towards citizen groups in Switzerland than in Denmark. The Swiss referendum institution makes parliamentarians more open to popular demands while in Denmark strong unions, a strong parliament and frequent minority governments make it more difficult for citizen groups to be heard.",
keywords = "Citizen groups, Denmark, Switzerland, corporatism, political opportunity structure",
author = "Christiansen, {Peter Munk} and Andr{\'e} Mach and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Varone",
year = "2018",
month = apr,
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/13501763.2016.1268194",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "526--545",
journal = "Journal of European Public Policy",
issn = "1350-1763",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How corporatist institutions shape the access of citizen groups to policy makers

T2 - Evidence from Denmark and Switzerland

AU - Christiansen, Peter Munk

AU - Mach, André

AU - Varone, Frédéric

PY - 2018/4/3

Y1 - 2018/4/3

N2 - Traditional corporatist groups such as business groups and unions still play an important role in many countries, and the rumors exaggerate the decline of corporatist structures. Nevertheless citizen groups have grown in number and political importance. The authors show that Danish and Swiss citizen groups have gained better access to the administrative and parliamentary venues in the period 1975–1985 through 2010, but with Swiss citizen groups more successful than their Danish counterparts, particularly with regard to the parliamentary venue. Danish and Swiss neo-corporatism has confronted similar socio-economic and political challenges during this period, but the political opportunity structure is more favorable towards citizen groups in Switzerland than in Denmark. The Swiss referendum institution makes parliamentarians more open to popular demands while in Denmark strong unions, a strong parliament and frequent minority governments make it more difficult for citizen groups to be heard.

AB - Traditional corporatist groups such as business groups and unions still play an important role in many countries, and the rumors exaggerate the decline of corporatist structures. Nevertheless citizen groups have grown in number and political importance. The authors show that Danish and Swiss citizen groups have gained better access to the administrative and parliamentary venues in the period 1975–1985 through 2010, but with Swiss citizen groups more successful than their Danish counterparts, particularly with regard to the parliamentary venue. Danish and Swiss neo-corporatism has confronted similar socio-economic and political challenges during this period, but the political opportunity structure is more favorable towards citizen groups in Switzerland than in Denmark. The Swiss referendum institution makes parliamentarians more open to popular demands while in Denmark strong unions, a strong parliament and frequent minority governments make it more difficult for citizen groups to be heard.

KW - Citizen groups

KW - Denmark

KW - Switzerland

KW - corporatism

KW - political opportunity structure

U2 - 10.1080/13501763.2016.1268194

DO - 10.1080/13501763.2016.1268194

M3 - Journal article

VL - 25

SP - 526

EP - 545

JO - Journal of European Public Policy

JF - Journal of European Public Policy

SN - 1350-1763

IS - 4

ER -