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Homogenization conditions affect the oxidative stability of fish oil enriched milk emulsions: oxidation linked to changes in protein composition at the oil-water interface.

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  • Ann-Dorit M. Sørensen, Department of Seafood Research, Danish Institute for Fisheries Research, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Danmark
  • Caroline P. Baron, Department of Seafood Research, Danish Institute for Fisheries Research, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Danmark
  • Mette B. Let, Department of Seafood Research, Danish Institute for Fisheries Research, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Danmark
  • Dagmar A. Brüggemann, LMC Centre for Advanced Food Imageing, Copenhagen University, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Danmark
  • Lise Refstrup Linnebjerg Pedersen
  • Charlotte Jacobsen, Department of Seafood Research, Danish Institute for Fisheries Research, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Danmark
  • Molekylærbiologisk Institut
Fish oil was incorporated into milk under different homogenization temperatures (50 and 72 °C) and pressures (5, 15, and 22.5 MPa). Subsequently, the oxidative stability of the milk and changes in the protein composition of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were examined. Results showed that high pressure and high temperature (72 °C and 22.5 MPa) resulted in less lipid oxidation, whereas low pressure and low temperature (50 °C and 5 MPa) resulted in faster lipid oxidation. Analysis of protein oxidation indicated that especially casein was prone to oxidation. The level of free thiol groups was increased by high temperature (72 °C) and with increasing pressure. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) indicated that high temperature resulted in an increase in β-lactoglobulin adsorbed at the oil−water interface. This was even more pronounced with higher pressure. Less casein seemed to be present at the oil−water interface with increasing pressure. Overall, the results indicated that a combination of more β-lactoglobulin and less casein at the oil−water interface gave the most stable emulsions with respect to lipid oxidation.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Vol/bind55
Nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1781-9
Antal sider9
ISSN0021-8561
StatusUdgivet - 2007

Bibliografisk note

Paper id:: 17288436

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