Headspace Passive Dosing of Volatile Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals from a Lipid Donor-Linking Their Toxicity to Well-Defined Exposure for an Improved Risk Assessment

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Headspace Passive Dosing of Volatile Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals from a Lipid Donor-Linking Their Toxicity to Well-Defined Exposure for an Improved Risk Assessment. / Trac, Lam Ngoc; Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Holmstrup, Martin; Mayer, Philipp.

I: Environmental Science & Technology, Bind 53, Nr. 22, 2019, s. 13468-13476.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Trac, Lam Ngoc ; Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard ; Holmstrup, Martin ; Mayer, Philipp. / Headspace Passive Dosing of Volatile Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals from a Lipid Donor-Linking Their Toxicity to Well-Defined Exposure for an Improved Risk Assessment. I: Environmental Science & Technology. 2019 ; Bind 53, Nr. 22. s. 13468-13476.

Bibtex

@article{9852b1351b9b42e0989f383b062c90e4,
title = "Headspace Passive Dosing of Volatile Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals from a Lipid Donor-Linking Their Toxicity to Well-Defined Exposure for an Improved Risk Assessment",
abstract = "High hydrophobicity and volatility of chemicals often lead to substantial experimental challenges but were here utilized in headspace passive dosing (HS-PD) to establish and maintain exposure: the pure chemical served as a passive dosing donor for controlling exposure at saturation, whereas triglyceride oil containing the chemical was used to control lower exposure levels. These donor solutions were added to glass inserts placed in the closed test systems. Mass balance calculations confirmed a dominant donor capacity for all chemicals except isooctane. This HS-PD method was applied to algal growth inhibition and springtail lethality tests with terpenes, alkanes, and cyclic siloxanes. Headspace concentrations above the lipid donors were measured for three chemicals to determine their chemical activity, using saturated vapor as the analytical standard and thermodynamic reference. Toxicity was related to chemical activity and calculated concentrations in membranes at equilibrium with the lipid donor. For both tests and all chemicals, toxic effects were observed within or above the reported range for baseline toxicity, meaning that no excess toxicity was observed. The toxicity of siloxanes was markedly higher to the terrestrial springtail than the aquatic algae, which is consistent with a more efficient mass transfer of these volatile hydrophobic chemicals in air compared to water.",
author = "Trac, {Lam Ngoc} and Schmidt, {Stine N{\o}rgaard} and Martin Holmstrup and Philipp Mayer",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1021/acs.est.9b04681",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "13468--13476",
journal = "Environmental Science & Technology (Washington)",
issn = "0013-936X",
publisher = "AMER CHEMICAL SOC",
number = "22",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Headspace Passive Dosing of Volatile Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals from a Lipid Donor-Linking Their Toxicity to Well-Defined Exposure for an Improved Risk Assessment

AU - Trac, Lam Ngoc

AU - Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard

AU - Holmstrup, Martin

AU - Mayer, Philipp

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - High hydrophobicity and volatility of chemicals often lead to substantial experimental challenges but were here utilized in headspace passive dosing (HS-PD) to establish and maintain exposure: the pure chemical served as a passive dosing donor for controlling exposure at saturation, whereas triglyceride oil containing the chemical was used to control lower exposure levels. These donor solutions were added to glass inserts placed in the closed test systems. Mass balance calculations confirmed a dominant donor capacity for all chemicals except isooctane. This HS-PD method was applied to algal growth inhibition and springtail lethality tests with terpenes, alkanes, and cyclic siloxanes. Headspace concentrations above the lipid donors were measured for three chemicals to determine their chemical activity, using saturated vapor as the analytical standard and thermodynamic reference. Toxicity was related to chemical activity and calculated concentrations in membranes at equilibrium with the lipid donor. For both tests and all chemicals, toxic effects were observed within or above the reported range for baseline toxicity, meaning that no excess toxicity was observed. The toxicity of siloxanes was markedly higher to the terrestrial springtail than the aquatic algae, which is consistent with a more efficient mass transfer of these volatile hydrophobic chemicals in air compared to water.

AB - High hydrophobicity and volatility of chemicals often lead to substantial experimental challenges but were here utilized in headspace passive dosing (HS-PD) to establish and maintain exposure: the pure chemical served as a passive dosing donor for controlling exposure at saturation, whereas triglyceride oil containing the chemical was used to control lower exposure levels. These donor solutions were added to glass inserts placed in the closed test systems. Mass balance calculations confirmed a dominant donor capacity for all chemicals except isooctane. This HS-PD method was applied to algal growth inhibition and springtail lethality tests with terpenes, alkanes, and cyclic siloxanes. Headspace concentrations above the lipid donors were measured for three chemicals to determine their chemical activity, using saturated vapor as the analytical standard and thermodynamic reference. Toxicity was related to chemical activity and calculated concentrations in membranes at equilibrium with the lipid donor. For both tests and all chemicals, toxic effects were observed within or above the reported range for baseline toxicity, meaning that no excess toxicity was observed. The toxicity of siloxanes was markedly higher to the terrestrial springtail than the aquatic algae, which is consistent with a more efficient mass transfer of these volatile hydrophobic chemicals in air compared to water.

U2 - 10.1021/acs.est.9b04681

DO - 10.1021/acs.est.9b04681

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31612707

VL - 53

SP - 13468

EP - 13476

JO - Environmental Science & Technology (Washington)

JF - Environmental Science & Technology (Washington)

SN - 0013-936X

IS - 22

ER -