Greener and leaner: Lower energy and water consumption, and reduced work orders, in newly constructed boston public housing

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Greener and leaner : Lower energy and water consumption, and reduced work orders, in newly constructed boston public housing. / Brod, Michael; Laurent, José Guillermo Cedeño; Kane, John; Colton, Meryl D.; Gabel, Charlotte; Adamkiewicz, Gary.

I: Atmosphere, Bind 11, Nr. 4, 329, 04.2020.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Brod, Michael ; Laurent, José Guillermo Cedeño ; Kane, John ; Colton, Meryl D. ; Gabel, Charlotte ; Adamkiewicz, Gary. / Greener and leaner : Lower energy and water consumption, and reduced work orders, in newly constructed boston public housing. I: Atmosphere. 2020 ; Bind 11, Nr. 4.

Bibtex

@article{72706c8addb24dd4a36021068eca304e,
title = "Greener and leaner: Lower energy and water consumption, and reduced work orders, in newly constructed boston public housing",
abstract = "The Boston Residential Investigation on Green and Healthy Transitions (BRIGHT) Study is focused on quantifying the effects of redeveloping public housing developments into new buildings with improved energy performance and indoor environmental quality. This report presents an analysis of utility consumption and work order requests at Old Colony and Washington-Beech, two redeveloped housing sites in Boston, Massachusetts. We compare the consumption of electricity, natural gas, and water, as well as work order data, from 2012-2014 to development-wide baseline data from 2006-2009. We found that despite the higher number of electric appliances in the new apartments (e.g., air conditioning and ranges), electricity consumption decreased 46% in Old Colony and nearly 30% in Washington-Beech when compared to the baseline data. Natural gas used for space heating decreased by more than 70% at both sites; and water use decreased by nearly 56% at Old Colony and nearly 30% at Washington-Beech. Work order categories that directly influence the residents' quality of life, such as pests, mold, windows and plumbing decreased by more than 50% in both renovated sites. In combination with previous documentation of health improvements in the redeveloped sites, these results provide further evidence of the magnitude of benefits from updating public housing infrastructure using green design principles.",
keywords = "Energy consumption, Green building, LEED, Public housing, Work orders",
author = "Michael Brod and Laurent, {Jos{\'e} Guillermo Cede{\~n}o} and John Kane and Colton, {Meryl D.} and Charlotte Gabel and Gary Adamkiewicz",
year = "2020",
month = apr,
doi = "10.3390/atmos11040329",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Atmosphere",
issn = "2073-4433",
publisher = "Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Greener and leaner

T2 - Lower energy and water consumption, and reduced work orders, in newly constructed boston public housing

AU - Brod, Michael

AU - Laurent, José Guillermo Cedeño

AU - Kane, John

AU - Colton, Meryl D.

AU - Gabel, Charlotte

AU - Adamkiewicz, Gary

PY - 2020/4

Y1 - 2020/4

N2 - The Boston Residential Investigation on Green and Healthy Transitions (BRIGHT) Study is focused on quantifying the effects of redeveloping public housing developments into new buildings with improved energy performance and indoor environmental quality. This report presents an analysis of utility consumption and work order requests at Old Colony and Washington-Beech, two redeveloped housing sites in Boston, Massachusetts. We compare the consumption of electricity, natural gas, and water, as well as work order data, from 2012-2014 to development-wide baseline data from 2006-2009. We found that despite the higher number of electric appliances in the new apartments (e.g., air conditioning and ranges), electricity consumption decreased 46% in Old Colony and nearly 30% in Washington-Beech when compared to the baseline data. Natural gas used for space heating decreased by more than 70% at both sites; and water use decreased by nearly 56% at Old Colony and nearly 30% at Washington-Beech. Work order categories that directly influence the residents' quality of life, such as pests, mold, windows and plumbing decreased by more than 50% in both renovated sites. In combination with previous documentation of health improvements in the redeveloped sites, these results provide further evidence of the magnitude of benefits from updating public housing infrastructure using green design principles.

AB - The Boston Residential Investigation on Green and Healthy Transitions (BRIGHT) Study is focused on quantifying the effects of redeveloping public housing developments into new buildings with improved energy performance and indoor environmental quality. This report presents an analysis of utility consumption and work order requests at Old Colony and Washington-Beech, two redeveloped housing sites in Boston, Massachusetts. We compare the consumption of electricity, natural gas, and water, as well as work order data, from 2012-2014 to development-wide baseline data from 2006-2009. We found that despite the higher number of electric appliances in the new apartments (e.g., air conditioning and ranges), electricity consumption decreased 46% in Old Colony and nearly 30% in Washington-Beech when compared to the baseline data. Natural gas used for space heating decreased by more than 70% at both sites; and water use decreased by nearly 56% at Old Colony and nearly 30% at Washington-Beech. Work order categories that directly influence the residents' quality of life, such as pests, mold, windows and plumbing decreased by more than 50% in both renovated sites. In combination with previous documentation of health improvements in the redeveloped sites, these results provide further evidence of the magnitude of benefits from updating public housing infrastructure using green design principles.

KW - Energy consumption

KW - Green building

KW - LEED

KW - Public housing

KW - Work orders

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85084735126&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/atmos11040329

DO - 10.3390/atmos11040329

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85084735126

VL - 11

JO - Atmosphere

JF - Atmosphere

SN - 2073-4433

IS - 4

M1 - 329

ER -