Glycemic Metrics Derived From Intermittently Scanned Continuous Glucose Monitoring

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Glycemic Metrics Derived From Intermittently Scanned Continuous Glucose Monitoring. / Hansen, Klavs Würgler; Bibby, Bo Martin.

I: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Bind 16, Nr. 1, 01.2022, s. 113-119.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Hansen KW, Bibby BM. Glycemic Metrics Derived From Intermittently Scanned Continuous Glucose Monitoring. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. 2022 jan.;16(1):113-119. Epub 2020 dec. 3. doi: 10.1177/1932296820975822

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Hansen, Klavs Würgler ; Bibby, Bo Martin. / Glycemic Metrics Derived From Intermittently Scanned Continuous Glucose Monitoring. I: Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. 2022 ; Bind 16, Nr. 1. s. 113-119.

Bibtex

@article{87de9bc59113416f8f697e668196ae27,
title = "Glycemic Metrics Derived From Intermittently Scanned Continuous Glucose Monitoring",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Glucose data from intermittently scanned continuous glucose monitoring (isCGM) is a combination of scanned and imported glucose values. The present knowledge of glycemic metrics originate mostly from glucose data from real-time CGM sampled every five minutes with a lack of information derived from isCGM.METHODS: Glucose data obtained with isCGM and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were obtained from 169 patients with type 1 diabetes. Sixty-one patients had two observations with an interval of more than three months.RESULTS: The best regression line of HbA1c against mean glucose was observed from 60 days prior to HbA1c measurement as compared to 14, 30, and 90 days. The difference between HbA1c and estimated HbA1c (=glucose management indicator [GMI]) first observed correlated with the second observation (R2 0.61, P < .001). Time in range (TIR, glucose between 3.9 and 10 mmol/L) was significantly related to GMI (R2 0.87, P < .001). A TIR of 70% corresponded to a GMI of 6.8% (95% confidence interval, 6.3-7.4). The fraction of patients with the optimal combination of TIR >70% and time below range (TBR) <4% was 3.6%. The fraction of patients with TBR>4% was four times higher for those with high glycemic variability (coefficient of variation [CV] >36%) than for those with lower CV.CONCLUSION: The individual difference between HbA1c and GMI was reproducible. High glycemic variability was related to increased TBR. A combination of TIR and TBR is suggested as a new composite quality indicator.",
keywords = "glycemic variability, hemoglobin A1c, intermittently scanned continuous gluclose monitoring, time in range, type 1 diabetes",
author = "Hansen, {Klavs W{\"u}rgler} and Bibby, {Bo Martin}",
year = "2022",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1177/1932296820975822",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "113--119",
journal = "Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology",
issn = "1932-2968",
publisher = "Sage Publications, Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Glycemic Metrics Derived From Intermittently Scanned Continuous Glucose Monitoring

AU - Hansen, Klavs Würgler

AU - Bibby, Bo Martin

PY - 2022/1

Y1 - 2022/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Glucose data from intermittently scanned continuous glucose monitoring (isCGM) is a combination of scanned and imported glucose values. The present knowledge of glycemic metrics originate mostly from glucose data from real-time CGM sampled every five minutes with a lack of information derived from isCGM.METHODS: Glucose data obtained with isCGM and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were obtained from 169 patients with type 1 diabetes. Sixty-one patients had two observations with an interval of more than three months.RESULTS: The best regression line of HbA1c against mean glucose was observed from 60 days prior to HbA1c measurement as compared to 14, 30, and 90 days. The difference between HbA1c and estimated HbA1c (=glucose management indicator [GMI]) first observed correlated with the second observation (R2 0.61, P < .001). Time in range (TIR, glucose between 3.9 and 10 mmol/L) was significantly related to GMI (R2 0.87, P < .001). A TIR of 70% corresponded to a GMI of 6.8% (95% confidence interval, 6.3-7.4). The fraction of patients with the optimal combination of TIR >70% and time below range (TBR) <4% was 3.6%. The fraction of patients with TBR>4% was four times higher for those with high glycemic variability (coefficient of variation [CV] >36%) than for those with lower CV.CONCLUSION: The individual difference between HbA1c and GMI was reproducible. High glycemic variability was related to increased TBR. A combination of TIR and TBR is suggested as a new composite quality indicator.

AB - BACKGROUND: Glucose data from intermittently scanned continuous glucose monitoring (isCGM) is a combination of scanned and imported glucose values. The present knowledge of glycemic metrics originate mostly from glucose data from real-time CGM sampled every five minutes with a lack of information derived from isCGM.METHODS: Glucose data obtained with isCGM and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were obtained from 169 patients with type 1 diabetes. Sixty-one patients had two observations with an interval of more than three months.RESULTS: The best regression line of HbA1c against mean glucose was observed from 60 days prior to HbA1c measurement as compared to 14, 30, and 90 days. The difference between HbA1c and estimated HbA1c (=glucose management indicator [GMI]) first observed correlated with the second observation (R2 0.61, P < .001). Time in range (TIR, glucose between 3.9 and 10 mmol/L) was significantly related to GMI (R2 0.87, P < .001). A TIR of 70% corresponded to a GMI of 6.8% (95% confidence interval, 6.3-7.4). The fraction of patients with the optimal combination of TIR >70% and time below range (TBR) <4% was 3.6%. The fraction of patients with TBR>4% was four times higher for those with high glycemic variability (coefficient of variation [CV] >36%) than for those with lower CV.CONCLUSION: The individual difference between HbA1c and GMI was reproducible. High glycemic variability was related to increased TBR. A combination of TIR and TBR is suggested as a new composite quality indicator.

KW - glycemic variability

KW - hemoglobin A1c

KW - intermittently scanned continuous gluclose monitoring

KW - time in range

KW - type 1 diabetes

U2 - 10.1177/1932296820975822

DO - 10.1177/1932296820975822

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33269634

VL - 16

SP - 113

EP - 119

JO - Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology

JF - Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology

SN - 1932-2968

IS - 1

ER -