Gender differences in respiratory health outcomes among farming cohorts around the globe: findings from the AGRICOH consortium

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  • Jonathan Fix, Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27514, USA., USA
  • Isabella Annesi-Maesano, Sorbonne Universités (UPMC, Frankrig
  • Isabelle Baldi, Univ Caen Basse Normandie, University of Caen, INSERM U1086, Caen, Frankrig
  • Mathilde Boulanger, Univ Caen Basse Normandie, University of Caen, INSERM U1086, Caen, Frankrig
  • Soo Cheng, Centre for Public Health Research, Massey University, Private Box 756, Wellington, New Zealand., New Zealand
  • Sandra Cortes, Advanced Center for Chronic Diseases (ACCDiS), Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile
  • Jean-Charles Dalphin, Service de Pneumologie, CHU de Besançon, Besançon, UMR 6249 Chrono-environnement, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, Frankrig
  • Mohamed Aqiel Dalvie, Division of Occupational Medicine and Centre for Environmental and Occupational Health Research, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Sydafrika
  • Bruno Degano, Division of Occupational Medicine and Centre for Environmental and Occupational Health Research, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa Universitaire (CHRU), Besançon, EA 3920, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, Sydafrika
  • Jeroen Douwes, Centre for Public Health Research, Massey University, Private Box 756, Wellington, New Zealand., New Zealand
  • Wijnand Eduard, The National Institute of Occupational Health (STAMI), Norge
  • Grethe Elholm
  • Catterina Ferreccio, Advanced Center for Chronic Diseases (ACCDiS), Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile
  • Anne-Helen Harding, Health and Safety Executive (HSE), Harpur Hill, Buxton, SK17 9JN, UK., Storbritannien
  • Mohamed Jeebhay, Division of Occupational Medicine and Centre for Environmental and Occupational Health Research, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Sydafrika
  • Kevin M Kelly, Department of Occupational and Environmental Health University of Iowa Iowa City, IA USA, USA
  • Hans Kromhout, Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, NL-3584 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands., Holland
  • Ewan MacFarlane, Monash Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health (MonCOEH), Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Australien
  • Cara Nichole Maesano, Sorbonne Universités (UPMC, Frankrig
  • Diane Catherine Mitchell, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, USA
  • Hussein Mwanga, Division of Occupational Medicine and Centre for Environmental and Occupational Health Research, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Sydafrika
  • Saloshni Naidoo, Discipline of Public Health Medicine, School of Nursing and Public Health, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Sydafrika
  • Beyene Negatu, Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, NL-3584 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands., Department of Pesticide Registration and control, Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock development, Addis Ababa, Holland
  • Dorothy Ngajilo, Division of Occupational Medicine and Centre for Environmental and Occupational Health Research, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Sydafrika
  • Karl-Christian Nordby, National Institute of Occupational Health, Norge
  • Christine G Parks, Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA
  • Marc B Schenker, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, USA
  • Aesun Shin, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biomedical Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, 110-799 Seoul, Republic of Korea., Sydkorea
  • Torben Sigsgaard
  • Malcolm Sim, Monash Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health (MonCOEH), Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Australien
  • Thibaud Soumagne, Service de Pneumologie, CHU de Besançon, Besançon, UMR 6249 Chrono-environnement, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, Frankrig
  • Peter Thorne, Department of Occupational and Environmental Health University of Iowa Iowa City, IA USA, USA
  • Keun-Young Yoo, Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110-799, Korea., Sydkorea
  • Jane A Hoppin, Department of Biological Sciences, Center for Human Health and the Environment, North Carolina State University, USA

Purpose: Respiratory hazards of farming have been identified for centuries, with little focus on gender differences. We used data from the AGRICOH consortium, a collective of prospective cohorts of agricultural workers, to assess respiratory disease prevalence among adults in 18 cohorts representing over 200,000 farmers, farm workers, and their spouses from six continents.Methods: Cohorts collected data between 1992 and 2016 and ranged in size from 200 to >128,000 individuals; 44% of participants were female. Farming practices varied from subsistence farming to large-scale industrial agriculture. All cohorts provided respiratory outcome information for their cohort based on their study definitions. The majority of outcomes were based on self-report using standard respiratory questionnaires; the greatest variability in assessment methods was associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Results: For all three respiratory symptoms (cough, phlegm, and wheeze), the median prevalence in men was higher than in women, with the greatest difference for phlegm (17% vs. 10%). For asthma, women had a higher prevalence (7.8% vs 6.5%), with the difference associated with allergic asthma. The relative proportion of allergic asthma varied among cohorts. In two of eight cohorts for women and two of seven cohorts for men, allergic asthma was more common than non-allergic asthma.Conclusions: These findings indicate that respiratory outcomes are common among farmers around the world despite differences in agricultural production. As women in the general population are at higher risk of asthma, exploring gender differences in occupational studies is critical for a deeper understanding of respiratory disease among agricultural workers.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Agromedicine
Vol/bind26
Nummer2
Sider (fra-til)97-108
Antal sider12
ISSN1059-924X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2021

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