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Frontal eye fields involved in shifting frame of reference within working memory for scenes

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Frontal eye fields involved in shifting frame of reference within working memory for scenes. / Wallentin, Mikkel; Roepstorff, Andreas; Burgess, Neil.

I: Neuropsychologia, Bind 46, 2008, s. 399-408.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{54c571404f6111dcbee902004c4f4f50,
title = "Frontal eye fields involved in shifting frame of reference within working memory for scenes",
abstract = "Working memory (WM) evoked by linguistic cues for allocentric spatial and egocentric spatial aspects of a visual scene was investigated by correlating fMRI BOLD signal (or {"}activation{"}) with performance on a spatial-relations task. Subjects indicated the relative positions of a person or object (referenced by the personal pronouns {"}he/she/it{"}) in a previously-shown image relative to either themselves (egocentric reference frame) or shifted to a reference frame anchored in another person or object in the image (allocentric reference frame), e.g. {"}Was he in front of you/her?{"} Good performers had both shorter response time and more correct responses than poor performers in both tasks. These behavioural variables were entered into a principal component analysis. The first component reflected generalised performance level. We found that the frontal eye fields (FEF), bilaterally, had a higher BOLD response during recall involving allocentric compared to egocentric spatial reference frames, and that this difference was larger in good performers than in poor performers as measured by the first behavioural principal component. The frontal eye fields may be used when subjects move their internal gaze during shifting reference frames in representational space. Analysis of actual eye movements in 3 subjects revealed no difference between egocentric and allocentric recall tasks where visual stimuli were also absent. Thus, the FEF machinery for directing eye movements may also be involved in changing reference frames within WM.",
author = "Mikkel Wallentin and Andreas Roepstorff and Neil Burgess",
note = "Paper id:: doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2007.08.014",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "399--408",
journal = "Neuropsychologia",
issn = "0028-3932",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Frontal eye fields involved in shifting frame of reference within working memory for scenes

AU - Wallentin, Mikkel

AU - Roepstorff, Andreas

AU - Burgess, Neil

N1 - Paper id:: doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2007.08.014

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Working memory (WM) evoked by linguistic cues for allocentric spatial and egocentric spatial aspects of a visual scene was investigated by correlating fMRI BOLD signal (or "activation") with performance on a spatial-relations task. Subjects indicated the relative positions of a person or object (referenced by the personal pronouns "he/she/it") in a previously-shown image relative to either themselves (egocentric reference frame) or shifted to a reference frame anchored in another person or object in the image (allocentric reference frame), e.g. "Was he in front of you/her?" Good performers had both shorter response time and more correct responses than poor performers in both tasks. These behavioural variables were entered into a principal component analysis. The first component reflected generalised performance level. We found that the frontal eye fields (FEF), bilaterally, had a higher BOLD response during recall involving allocentric compared to egocentric spatial reference frames, and that this difference was larger in good performers than in poor performers as measured by the first behavioural principal component. The frontal eye fields may be used when subjects move their internal gaze during shifting reference frames in representational space. Analysis of actual eye movements in 3 subjects revealed no difference between egocentric and allocentric recall tasks where visual stimuli were also absent. Thus, the FEF machinery for directing eye movements may also be involved in changing reference frames within WM.

AB - Working memory (WM) evoked by linguistic cues for allocentric spatial and egocentric spatial aspects of a visual scene was investigated by correlating fMRI BOLD signal (or "activation") with performance on a spatial-relations task. Subjects indicated the relative positions of a person or object (referenced by the personal pronouns "he/she/it") in a previously-shown image relative to either themselves (egocentric reference frame) or shifted to a reference frame anchored in another person or object in the image (allocentric reference frame), e.g. "Was he in front of you/her?" Good performers had both shorter response time and more correct responses than poor performers in both tasks. These behavioural variables were entered into a principal component analysis. The first component reflected generalised performance level. We found that the frontal eye fields (FEF), bilaterally, had a higher BOLD response during recall involving allocentric compared to egocentric spatial reference frames, and that this difference was larger in good performers than in poor performers as measured by the first behavioural principal component. The frontal eye fields may be used when subjects move their internal gaze during shifting reference frames in representational space. Analysis of actual eye movements in 3 subjects revealed no difference between egocentric and allocentric recall tasks where visual stimuli were also absent. Thus, the FEF machinery for directing eye movements may also be involved in changing reference frames within WM.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 46

SP - 399

EP - 408

JO - Neuropsychologia

JF - Neuropsychologia

SN - 0028-3932

ER -