Fragility fractures and health-related quality of life: does socio-economic status widen the gap? A population-based study

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Summary: Studying 12,839 fracture cases and 91,426 controls, we found that fractures of the spine and hip are associated with clinically important HRQoL deficits up to 5 years post-fracture. Fracture cases with a low educational attainment are more likely to report very low HRQoL due to a low pre-fracture HRQoL. Introduction: The aim of this study was to explore the short-term and long-term impact of fractures on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and to study the effect of educational attainment as a proxy for socio-economic status (SES) on post-fracture HRQoL. Methods: In a population-based survey including 12,839 fracture cases and 91,426 controls, HRQoL was measured using the physical component score (PCS) and the mental component score (MCS) of the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). Information about fractures, age, sex, ethnicity, comorbidity and SES was obtained from national registers. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to measure the mean HRQoL difference, termed deficit, between non-fracture controls and fracture cases (all fractures combined and fractures at six different skeletal sites). Results: PCS and MCS were significantly lower among fracture cases than among controls. Statistically and clinically important PCS deficits (≥ 5 points) were observed among people with fractures of the spine and hip up to 5 years post-fracture and among people with upper arm fractures up to 1 year post-fracture. Greater deficits were observed for MCS but not for PCS in post-fracture HRQoL in the low than in the high SES group. Conclusion: Fractures of the spine and hip are associated with clinically important deficits in physical HRQoL up to 5 years post-fracture. Low educational attainment widened the gap in mental but not in physical post-fracture HRQoL. However, due to low pre-fracture PCS and MCS, people with a low educational attainment and fractures were more likely to report very low HRQoL post-fracture.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftOsteoporosis International
Vol/bind32
Nummer1
Sider (fra-til)63-73
Antal sider11
ISSN0937-941X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2021

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