Forest canopy height co-determines taxonomic and functional richness, but not functional dispersion of mammals and birds globally

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  • Gang Feng, Inner Mongolia University
  • ,
  • Jian Zhang, East China Normal University
  • ,
  • Marco Girardello, Universidade dos Açores
  • ,
  • Vincent Pellissier
  • ,
  • Jens Christian Svenning

Aims: Taller forest canopies may harbour higher biodiversity by providing more and varied resources. No previous studies have assessed whether forest canopy height shapes the taxonomic and functional diversity of terrestrial vertebrates at global and regional scales. Here, we examine the roles of forest canopy height and other environmental variables in shaping global and regional patterns of species richness and functional diversity of mammals and birds. Location: Global. Time period: Present day. Major taxa studied: Terrestrial mammals and birds. Methods: Global forest canopy height data at 1 km spatial resolution were used to measure forest vertical structure. Species richness, functional richness and functional dispersion of mammals and birds were calculated using range maps and trait data. Spatial simultaneous autoregressive error models were used to evaluate associations between species richness and functional diversity and their predictors, including mean canopy height, standard deviation of canopy height, net primary productivity, current climate and historical climate stability, topography and human activities. Results: Mean canopy height emerged as one of two predictors most associated with species richness of mammals and birds as well as mammal functional richness. However, mean canopy height had little explanatory power for functional dispersion. Mean annual temperature and net primary productivity contributed most to explain global-scale mammal and bird functional dispersion. At the regional scale, mean canopy height, net primary productivity and mean annual temperature were the variables most associated with the species richness and functional diversity of mammals and birds. Main conclusions: Forest canopy height is an important predictor of species richness and functional diversity of terrestrial vertebrates at both global and regional scales, at a similar overall level to productivity and temperature. Our study highlights the crucial role of the complex vertical structure in shaping the global and regional patterns of vertebrate diversity.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftGlobal Ecology and Biogeography
Vol/bind29
Nummer8
Sider (fra-til)1350-1359
Antal sider10
ISSN1466-822X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2020

Se relationer på Aarhus Universitet Citationsformater

ID: 190880859