Flavonoid intake is associated with lower mortality in the Danish Diet Cancer and Health Cohort

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  • Nicola P Bondonno, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia., Australien
  • Frederik Dalgaard, Department of Cardiology, Herlev and Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Cecilie Kyrø, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark., Danmark
  • Kevin Murray, School of Population and Global Health, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia., Australien
  • Catherine P Bondonno, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia., Australien
  • Joshua R Lewis, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
  • ,
  • Kevin D Croft, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia., Australien
  • Gunnar Gislason, Department of Cardiology, Herlev and Gentofte University Hospital, Denmark., Danmark
  • Augustin Scalbert, Biostatistics Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France., Frankrig
  • Aedin Cassidy, Institute for Global Food Security, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland., Storbritannien
  • Anne Tjønneland, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark., Danmark
  • Kim Overvad
  • Jonathan M Hodgson, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia., Australien

Flavonoids, plant-derived polyphenolic compounds, have been linked with health benefits. However, evidence from observational studies is incomplete; studies on cancer mortality are scarce and moderating effects of lifestyle risk factors for early mortality are unknown. In this prospective cohort study including 56,048 participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort crosslinked with Danish nationwide registries and followed for 23 years, there are 14,083 deaths. A moderate habitual intake of flavonoids is inversely associated with all-cause, cardiovascular- and cancer-related mortality. This strong association plateaus at intakes of approximately 500 mg/day. Furthermore, the inverse associations between total flavonoid intake and mortality outcomes are stronger and more linear in smokers than in non-smokers, as well as in heavy (>20 g/d) vs. low-moderate (<20 g/d) alcohol consumers. These findings highlight the potential to reduce mortality through recommendations to increase intakes of flavonoid-rich foods, particularly in smokers and high alcohol consumers.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer3651
TidsskriftNature Communications
Vol/bind10
Nummer1
Antal sider10
ISSN2041-1723
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2019

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