Febrile seizures

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Febrile seizures. / Østergaard, John R.

I: Acta Paediatrica, Bind 98, Nr. 5, 2009, s. 771-3.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Østergaard, JR 2009, 'Febrile seizures', Acta Paediatrica, bind 98, nr. 5, s. 771-3. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01200.x

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Østergaard, John R. / Febrile seizures. I: Acta Paediatrica. 2009 ; Bind 98, Nr. 5. s. 771-3.

Bibtex

@article{392c57c0073611dfb95d000ea68e967b,
title = "Febrile seizures",
abstract = "Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common seizure disorder in childhood, affecting 2-5% of children between the ages of 3 and 60 months. Differentiation of FS from acute symptomatic seizures secondary to central nervous system infection is essential. Those with a focal onset, prolonged duration or which occur more than once within the same febrile illness are considered complex and have an increase in risk of subsequent epilepsy development. The vast majority of febrile convulsions are simple, lasting only a few minutes and without need of drug intervention. They have an excellent outcome with no increased risk of decline in IQ, subsequent epilepsy or increased mortality. Febrile seizure can recur, and as it often is a frightening and anxiety-provoking event for parents and caregivers, an understanding of the natural history and prognosis should enable the physician to reassure the parents providing an appropriate counselling and reassurance. CONCLUSION: Febrile seizure can recur, and as it often is a frightening and anxiety-provoking event for parent and caregivers. An understanding of the natural history and prognosis should enable the physician to reassure the parents providing an appropriate counselling and reassurance.",
keywords = "Child, Preschool, Counseling, Humans, Infant, Recurrence, Seizures, Febrile",
author = "{\O}stergaard, {John R}",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01200.x",
language = "English",
volume = "98",
pages = "771--3",
journal = "Acta Paediatrica",
issn = "0803-5253",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Febrile seizures

AU - Østergaard, John R

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common seizure disorder in childhood, affecting 2-5% of children between the ages of 3 and 60 months. Differentiation of FS from acute symptomatic seizures secondary to central nervous system infection is essential. Those with a focal onset, prolonged duration or which occur more than once within the same febrile illness are considered complex and have an increase in risk of subsequent epilepsy development. The vast majority of febrile convulsions are simple, lasting only a few minutes and without need of drug intervention. They have an excellent outcome with no increased risk of decline in IQ, subsequent epilepsy or increased mortality. Febrile seizure can recur, and as it often is a frightening and anxiety-provoking event for parents and caregivers, an understanding of the natural history and prognosis should enable the physician to reassure the parents providing an appropriate counselling and reassurance. CONCLUSION: Febrile seizure can recur, and as it often is a frightening and anxiety-provoking event for parent and caregivers. An understanding of the natural history and prognosis should enable the physician to reassure the parents providing an appropriate counselling and reassurance.

AB - Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common seizure disorder in childhood, affecting 2-5% of children between the ages of 3 and 60 months. Differentiation of FS from acute symptomatic seizures secondary to central nervous system infection is essential. Those with a focal onset, prolonged duration or which occur more than once within the same febrile illness are considered complex and have an increase in risk of subsequent epilepsy development. The vast majority of febrile convulsions are simple, lasting only a few minutes and without need of drug intervention. They have an excellent outcome with no increased risk of decline in IQ, subsequent epilepsy or increased mortality. Febrile seizure can recur, and as it often is a frightening and anxiety-provoking event for parents and caregivers, an understanding of the natural history and prognosis should enable the physician to reassure the parents providing an appropriate counselling and reassurance. CONCLUSION: Febrile seizure can recur, and as it often is a frightening and anxiety-provoking event for parent and caregivers. An understanding of the natural history and prognosis should enable the physician to reassure the parents providing an appropriate counselling and reassurance.

KW - Child, Preschool

KW - Counseling

KW - Humans

KW - Infant

KW - Recurrence

KW - Seizures, Febrile

U2 - 10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01200.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01200.x

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19389119

VL - 98

SP - 771

EP - 773

JO - Acta Paediatrica

JF - Acta Paediatrica

SN - 0803-5253

IS - 5

ER -