Father Absence in Pregnancy or During Childhood and Pubertal Development in Girls and Boys: A Population-Based Cohort Study

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Father Absence in Pregnancy or During Childhood and Pubertal Development in Girls and Boys : A Population-Based Cohort Study. / Gaml-Sørensen, Anne; Brix, Nis; Ernst, Andreas; Lunddorf, Lea Lykke Harrits; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst.

I: Child Development, 05.01.2021.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{159b68222ad74fdc98832a924a8f3897,
title = "Father Absence in Pregnancy or During Childhood and Pubertal Development in Girls and Boys: A Population-Based Cohort Study",
abstract = "This cohort study, including 15,810 children born 2000-2003 in Denmark, aimed to investigate the association between father absence in pregnancy or during childhood and pubertal development in girls and boys. The children were followed from 11 years of age and throughout pubertal development. Mean age differences according to exposure groups were estimated for each pubertal marker separately and for a combined pubertal marker. The results suggested that father absence in pregnancy and during childhood was associated with earlier pubertal development in girls, and father absence from late childhood was associated with earlier pubertal development in boys. The paternal investment theory, the psychosocial acceleration theory and the energetics theory were explored, and did not seem to explain the observed associations.",
author = "Anne Gaml-S{\o}rensen and Nis Brix and Andreas Ernst and Lunddorf, {Lea Lykke Harrits} and Ramlau-Hansen, {Cecilia H{\o}st}",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2021 Society for Research in Child Development.",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
day = "5",
doi = "10.1111/cdev.13488",
language = "English",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Father Absence in Pregnancy or During Childhood and Pubertal Development in Girls and Boys

T2 - A Population-Based Cohort Study

AU - Gaml-Sørensen, Anne

AU - Brix, Nis

AU - Ernst, Andreas

AU - Lunddorf, Lea Lykke Harrits

AU - Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst

N1 - © 2021 Society for Research in Child Development.

PY - 2021/1/5

Y1 - 2021/1/5

N2 - This cohort study, including 15,810 children born 2000-2003 in Denmark, aimed to investigate the association between father absence in pregnancy or during childhood and pubertal development in girls and boys. The children were followed from 11 years of age and throughout pubertal development. Mean age differences according to exposure groups were estimated for each pubertal marker separately and for a combined pubertal marker. The results suggested that father absence in pregnancy and during childhood was associated with earlier pubertal development in girls, and father absence from late childhood was associated with earlier pubertal development in boys. The paternal investment theory, the psychosocial acceleration theory and the energetics theory were explored, and did not seem to explain the observed associations.

AB - This cohort study, including 15,810 children born 2000-2003 in Denmark, aimed to investigate the association between father absence in pregnancy or during childhood and pubertal development in girls and boys. The children were followed from 11 years of age and throughout pubertal development. Mean age differences according to exposure groups were estimated for each pubertal marker separately and for a combined pubertal marker. The results suggested that father absence in pregnancy and during childhood was associated with earlier pubertal development in girls, and father absence from late childhood was associated with earlier pubertal development in boys. The paternal investment theory, the psychosocial acceleration theory and the energetics theory were explored, and did not seem to explain the observed associations.

U2 - 10.1111/cdev.13488

DO - 10.1111/cdev.13488

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33400273

JO - Child Development

JF - Child Development

SN - 0009-3920

ER -