Experts or advocates: Shifting roles of central sources used by journalists in news stories?

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Experts or advocates : Shifting roles of central sources used by journalists in news stories? / Laursen, Bo; Trapp, N. Leila.

I: Journalism Practice, Bind 15, Nr. 1, 2021, s. 1-18.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{689f99a7f5b549b489bef47df2d6444a,
title = "Experts or advocates: Shifting roles of central sources used by journalists in news stories?",
abstract = "This study empirically examines suspected shifts in journalist practices in western democracies regarding the granting of expert, vis-{\'a}-vis advocate, roles to central social actor types used as sources in news stories: interest groups, think tanks, and independent university researchers. The theoretical foundation includes well-established concepts, e.g., the objectivity norm; credibility; expertise; advocacy, and reporting biases. A characterization of the actor types indicates that independent researchers are prototypical experts, while interest groups and think tanks must strive to earn credibility due to ideological commitments. An analysis of Danish newstories indicates that the expert-advocate distinction is indeed blurring, including changes in journalists{\textquoteright} market for expertise. Of the three actors, think tanks are most frequently cast as experts, due to persistent reference to their own research. Interest groups, while mostly advocating by expressing what they find (un)desirable, rarely refer to their own research.Independent researchers refer least often to their research, and more frequently advocate. Proposed explanations for shiftingroles include the professionalization of interest groups; the growing pervasiveness of think tanks; and the proliferation of politicalundertones in university research. The discussion ends with a call for even sharper critical skills amongst journalists and audiences,in order to skillfully navigate these remarkable shifts.",
keywords = "Source roles, Expertise, credibility, Advocacy, Think tanks, Interest Groups, Sourcing in news journalism, University researchers",
author = "Bo Laursen and Trapp, {N. Leila}",
year = "2021",
doi = "10.1080/17512786.2019.1695537",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "1--18",
journal = "Journalism Practice",
issn = "1751-2786",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experts or advocates

T2 - Shifting roles of central sources used by journalists in news stories?

AU - Laursen, Bo

AU - Trapp, N. Leila

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - This study empirically examines suspected shifts in journalist practices in western democracies regarding the granting of expert, vis-á-vis advocate, roles to central social actor types used as sources in news stories: interest groups, think tanks, and independent university researchers. The theoretical foundation includes well-established concepts, e.g., the objectivity norm; credibility; expertise; advocacy, and reporting biases. A characterization of the actor types indicates that independent researchers are prototypical experts, while interest groups and think tanks must strive to earn credibility due to ideological commitments. An analysis of Danish newstories indicates that the expert-advocate distinction is indeed blurring, including changes in journalists’ market for expertise. Of the three actors, think tanks are most frequently cast as experts, due to persistent reference to their own research. Interest groups, while mostly advocating by expressing what they find (un)desirable, rarely refer to their own research.Independent researchers refer least often to their research, and more frequently advocate. Proposed explanations for shiftingroles include the professionalization of interest groups; the growing pervasiveness of think tanks; and the proliferation of politicalundertones in university research. The discussion ends with a call for even sharper critical skills amongst journalists and audiences,in order to skillfully navigate these remarkable shifts.

AB - This study empirically examines suspected shifts in journalist practices in western democracies regarding the granting of expert, vis-á-vis advocate, roles to central social actor types used as sources in news stories: interest groups, think tanks, and independent university researchers. The theoretical foundation includes well-established concepts, e.g., the objectivity norm; credibility; expertise; advocacy, and reporting biases. A characterization of the actor types indicates that independent researchers are prototypical experts, while interest groups and think tanks must strive to earn credibility due to ideological commitments. An analysis of Danish newstories indicates that the expert-advocate distinction is indeed blurring, including changes in journalists’ market for expertise. Of the three actors, think tanks are most frequently cast as experts, due to persistent reference to their own research. Interest groups, while mostly advocating by expressing what they find (un)desirable, rarely refer to their own research.Independent researchers refer least often to their research, and more frequently advocate. Proposed explanations for shiftingroles include the professionalization of interest groups; the growing pervasiveness of think tanks; and the proliferation of politicalundertones in university research. The discussion ends with a call for even sharper critical skills amongst journalists and audiences,in order to skillfully navigate these remarkable shifts.

KW - Source roles

KW - Expertise

KW - credibility

KW - Advocacy

KW - Think tanks

KW - Interest Groups

KW - Sourcing in news journalism

KW - University researchers

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076058474&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/17512786.2019.1695537

DO - 10.1080/17512786.2019.1695537

M3 - Journal article

VL - 15

SP - 1

EP - 18

JO - Journalism Practice

JF - Journalism Practice

SN - 1751-2786

IS - 1

ER -