Experts or advocates: Shifting roles of central sources used by journalists in news stories?

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

This study empirically examines suspected shifts in journalist practices in western democracies regarding the granting of expert,
vis-á-vis advocate, roles to central social actor types used as sources in news stories: interest groups, think tanks, and independent
university researchers. The theoretical foundation includes well-established concepts, e.g., the objectivity norm; credibility;
expertise; advocacy, and reporting biases. A characterization of the actor types indicates that independent researchers are
prototypical experts, while interest groups and think tanks must strive to earn credibility due to ideological commitments. An
analysis of Danish newstories indicates that the expert-advocate distinction is indeed blurring, including changes in journalists’
market for expertise. Of the three actors, think tanks are most frequently cast as experts, due to persistent reference to their own
research. Interest groups, while mostly advocating by expressing what they find (un)desirable, rarely refer to their own research.
Independent researchers refer least often to their research, and more frequently advocate. Proposed explanations for shifting
roles include the professionalization of interest groups; the growing pervasiveness of think tanks; and the proliferation of political
undertones in university research. The discussion ends with a call for even sharper critical skills amongst journalists and audiences,
in order to skillfully navigate these remarkable shifts.
Bidragets oversatte titelEksperter eller fortaler: Skiftende roller for kilde, som er brugt af journalister i nyheder?
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournalism Practice
Vol/bind15
Nummer1
Sider (fra-til)1-18
Antal sider18
ISSN1751-2786
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2021

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