Institut for Statskundskab

Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark

Publikation: KonferencebidragPaperForskning

Standard

Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark. / Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar.

2012. Paper præsenteret ved 70th Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, USA.

Publikation: KonferencebidragPaperForskning

Harvard

Dinesen, PT & Sønderskov, KM 2012, 'Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark', Paper fremlagt ved 70th Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, USA, 12/04/2012 - 15/04/2012.

APA

Dinesen, P. T., & Sønderskov, K. M. (2012). Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark. Paper præsenteret ved 70th Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, USA.

CBE

Dinesen PT, Sønderskov KM. 2012. Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark. Paper præsenteret ved 70th Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, USA.

MLA

Dinesen, Peter Thisted og Kim Mannemar Sønderskov Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark. 70th Midwest Political Science Association Conference, 12 apr. 2012, Chicago, USA, Paper, 2012.

Vancouver

Dinesen PT, Sønderskov KM. Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark. 2012. Paper præsenteret ved 70th Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, USA.

Author

Dinesen, Peter Thisted ; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar. / Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark. Paper præsenteret ved 70th Midwest Political Science Association Conference, Chicago, USA.

Bibtex

@conference{4d0880aca1b747ab94ed4dfbc00a2316,
title = "Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark",
abstract = "The question about how ethnic diversity affects social trust has been a hot topic in recent years. To this point, within-country analyses of this question have been limited by only having data on contextual ethnic diversity at relatively high levels of aggregation. Consequently, the previous analyses suffer from the problem thataggregate contextual diversity likely conceals substantial variation in the ethnic diversity actually experienced at the micro-level in which people live and interact (i.e. contains measurement error). This in turn renders the estimate of ethnic diversity on trust both imprecise and downward biased (due to attenuation bias). In the present paper we add to the literature by analyzing, as the first study ever, how ethnic diversity of the immediate micro-context affects people{\textquoteright}s trust in others. In addition, we compare the effect in the micro context to the impact of ethnic diversity at higher levels of aggregation in order to scrutinize how the relationship varies according to the contextual unit in which ethnic diversity is measured. We analyze the question about the impact of ethnic diversity on trust using Danish data from the European Social Survey, which are linked with data from the national Danish registers. The latter data contain detailed information about the ethnic background and the address of everyone living in Denmark. This enables us to obtain precise measures of ethnic diversity of the immediate surroundings in which each respondent lives. In the analysis we include measures of ethnic diversity in contextual units ranging from a radius of 80 meters up to 2750 meters within the address of a given respondent. In line with our expectations, the results show that increased ethnic diversity in the immediate surroundings affects generalized trust negatively, while the effectvanishes in larger contextual units.",
author = "Dinesen, {Peter Thisted} and S{\o}nderskov, {Kim Mannemar}",
year = "2012",
month = apr,
day = "12",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 12-04-2012 Through 15-04-2012",

}

RIS

TY - CONF

T1 - Ethnic diversity of the micro-context and social trust: Evidence from Denmark

AU - Dinesen, Peter Thisted

AU - Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

PY - 2012/4/12

Y1 - 2012/4/12

N2 - The question about how ethnic diversity affects social trust has been a hot topic in recent years. To this point, within-country analyses of this question have been limited by only having data on contextual ethnic diversity at relatively high levels of aggregation. Consequently, the previous analyses suffer from the problem thataggregate contextual diversity likely conceals substantial variation in the ethnic diversity actually experienced at the micro-level in which people live and interact (i.e. contains measurement error). This in turn renders the estimate of ethnic diversity on trust both imprecise and downward biased (due to attenuation bias). In the present paper we add to the literature by analyzing, as the first study ever, how ethnic diversity of the immediate micro-context affects people’s trust in others. In addition, we compare the effect in the micro context to the impact of ethnic diversity at higher levels of aggregation in order to scrutinize how the relationship varies according to the contextual unit in which ethnic diversity is measured. We analyze the question about the impact of ethnic diversity on trust using Danish data from the European Social Survey, which are linked with data from the national Danish registers. The latter data contain detailed information about the ethnic background and the address of everyone living in Denmark. This enables us to obtain precise measures of ethnic diversity of the immediate surroundings in which each respondent lives. In the analysis we include measures of ethnic diversity in contextual units ranging from a radius of 80 meters up to 2750 meters within the address of a given respondent. In line with our expectations, the results show that increased ethnic diversity in the immediate surroundings affects generalized trust negatively, while the effectvanishes in larger contextual units.

AB - The question about how ethnic diversity affects social trust has been a hot topic in recent years. To this point, within-country analyses of this question have been limited by only having data on contextual ethnic diversity at relatively high levels of aggregation. Consequently, the previous analyses suffer from the problem thataggregate contextual diversity likely conceals substantial variation in the ethnic diversity actually experienced at the micro-level in which people live and interact (i.e. contains measurement error). This in turn renders the estimate of ethnic diversity on trust both imprecise and downward biased (due to attenuation bias). In the present paper we add to the literature by analyzing, as the first study ever, how ethnic diversity of the immediate micro-context affects people’s trust in others. In addition, we compare the effect in the micro context to the impact of ethnic diversity at higher levels of aggregation in order to scrutinize how the relationship varies according to the contextual unit in which ethnic diversity is measured. We analyze the question about the impact of ethnic diversity on trust using Danish data from the European Social Survey, which are linked with data from the national Danish registers. The latter data contain detailed information about the ethnic background and the address of everyone living in Denmark. This enables us to obtain precise measures of ethnic diversity of the immediate surroundings in which each respondent lives. In the analysis we include measures of ethnic diversity in contextual units ranging from a radius of 80 meters up to 2750 meters within the address of a given respondent. In line with our expectations, the results show that increased ethnic diversity in the immediate surroundings affects generalized trust negatively, while the effectvanishes in larger contextual units.

M3 - Paper

Y2 - 12 April 2012 through 15 April 2012

ER -