Estimated Substitution of Tea or Coffee for Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Was Associated with Lower Type 2 Diabetes Incidence in Case-Cohort Analysis across 8 European Countries in the EPIC-InterAct Study

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  • Fumiaki Imamura, Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom., Storbritannien
  • Matthias B Schulze, Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Germen Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam, Germany., Tyskland
  • Stephen J Sharp, Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom., Storbritannien
  • Marcela Guevara, Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain., Spanien
  • Dora Romaguera, CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition, Madrid, Spain., Imperial College London, Research Institute of Health Sciences (IUNICS-IdISBa), University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain., Spanien
  • Benedetta Bendinelli, Cancer Risk Factors and Lifestyle Epidemiology Unit, Institute for cancer research, prevention and clinical network (ISPRO), Florence, Italy., Italien
  • Elena Salamanca-Fernández, Andalusian School of Public Health, Institute of Investigation Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (ibs.GRANADA), University of Granada, Granada, Spain., CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spanien
  • Eva Ardanaz, Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain., Spanien
  • Larraitz Arriola, CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, San Sebastian, Spain Instituto BIO-Donostia, Basque Government, Donostia, Spain., Spanien
  • Dagfinn Aune, Bjørknes University College, Oslo, Norway., Imperial College London, Ullevaal University Hospital, Oslo, Norway., Norge
  • Heiner Boeing, Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Germen Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam, Germany., Tyskland
  • Courtney Dow, Inserm (National Institute of Health and Medical Research), CESP (Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health), U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, 70-115 Villejuif, France., Gustave Roussy Institute , University Paris-Saclay, University Paris-Sud, Villejuif, Frankrig
  • Guy Fagherazzi, Inserm (National Institute of Health and Medical Research), CESP (Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health), U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, 70-115 Villejuif, France., Gustave Roussy Institute , University Paris-Saclay, University Paris-Sud, Villejuif, Frankrig
  • Paul W Franks, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden., Umeå University, Sverige
  • Heinz Freisling, Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France., Frankrig
  • Paula Jakszyn, FCS Blanquerna, Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona, Spain., Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spanien
  • Rudolf Kaaks, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany., Tyskland
  • Kay-Tee Khaw, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, School of Clinical Medicine, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Storbritannien
  • Tilman Kühn, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany., Tyskland
  • Francesca R Mancini, Inserm (National Institute of Health and Medical Research), CESP (Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health), U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, 70-115 Villejuif, France., Gustave Roussy Institute , University Paris-Saclay, University Paris-Sud, Villejuif, Frankrig
  • Giovanna Masala, Cancer Risk Factors and Lifestyle Epidemiology Unit, Institute for cancer research, prevention and clinical network (ISPRO), Florence, Italy., Italien
  • Maria-Dolores Chirlaque, Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Authority, Murcia, Spain; Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain., CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Spanien
  • Peter M Nilsson, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden., Sverige
  • Kim Overvad
  • Valeria M Pala, 12 Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy., Italien
  • Salvatore Panico, Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Corso Umberto I, 40, 80138 Naples, Italy., Italien
  • Aurora Perez-Cornago, Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health University of Oxford, United Kingdom., Storbritannien
  • Jose R Quirós, Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain., Spanien
  • Fulvio Ricceri, Unit of Epidemiology, Regional Health Service ASL TO3, Grugliasco (TO), Italy., University of Turin, Italien
  • Miguel Rodríguez-Barranco, Andalusian School of Public Health, Institute of Investigation Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (ibs.GRANADA), University of Granada, Granada, Spain., CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Spanien
  • Olov Rolandsson, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Family Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, 90185, Sweden., Sverige
  • Ivonne Sluijs, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands., Holland
  • Magdalena Stepien, Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France., Frankrig
  • Annemieke M W Spijkerman, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands., Holland
  • Anne Tjønneland, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark., Danmark
  • Tammy Y N Tong, Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health University of Oxford, United Kingdom., Storbritannien
  • Rosario Tumino, Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, "Civic M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP, Ragusa, Italy., Italien
  • Linda E T Vissers, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands., Holland
  • Heather A Ward, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom., Storbritannien
  • Claudia Langenberg, Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom., Storbritannien
  • Elio Riboli, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom., Storbritannien
  • Nita G Forouhi, Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom., Storbritannien
  • Nick J Wareham, Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom., Storbritannien

INTRODUCTION: Beverage consumption is a modifiable risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but there is insufficient evidence to inform the suitability of substituting 1 type of beverage for another.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of T2D when consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) was replaced with consumption of fruit juice, milk, coffee, or tea.

METHODS: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study of 8 European countries (n = 27,662, with 12,333 cases of incident T2D, 1992-2007), beverage consumption was estimated at baseline by dietary questionnaires. Using Prentice-weighted Cox regression adjusting for other beverages and potential confounders, we estimated associations of substituting 1 type of beverage for another on incident T2D.

RESULTS: Mean ± SD of estimated consumption of SSB was 55 ± 105 g/d. Means ± SDs for the other beverages were as follows: fruit juice, 59 ± 101 g/d; milk, 209 ± 203 g/d; coffee, 381 ± 372 g/d; and tea, 152 ± 282 g/d. Substituting coffee for SSBs by 250 g/d was associated with a 21% lower incidence of T2D (95% CI: 12%, 29%). The rate difference was -12.0 (95% CI: -20.0, -5.0) per 10,000 person-years among adults consuming SSBs ≥250 g/d (absolute rate = 48.3/10,000). Substituting tea for SSBs was estimated to lower T2D incidence by 22% (95% CI: 15%, 28%) or -11.0 (95% CI: -20.0, -2.6) per 10,000 person-years, whereas substituting fruit juice or milk was estimated not to alter T2D risk significantly.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate a potential benefit of substituting coffee or tea for SSBs for the primary prevention of T2D and may help formulate public health recommendations on beverage consumption in different populations.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Journal of Nutrition
Vol/bind149
Nummer11
Sider (fra-til)1985-1993
Antal sider9
ISSN0022-3166
DOI
StatusUdgivet - nov. 2019

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Copyright © American Society for Nutrition 2019.

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