Psykologisk Institut

Episodic future thinking in 35-, 47-, and 55-month-old children

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Episodic future thinking in 35-, 47-, and 55-month-old children. / Svane, Riikka Pauliina; Jensen, Toril; Hjuler, Tirill Fjellhaugen; Sonne, Trine; Kingo, Osman Skjold; Krøjgaard, Peter.

I: Nordic Psychology (Online), 01.02.2021.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{7eb7b18f7b934dd5a505c0b619bbbce1,
title = "Episodic future thinking in 35-, 47-, and 55-month-old children",
abstract = "The trip task has been used as a verbal test for examining preschool children{\textquoteright}s episodic future thinking. However, the only existing study using the trip task merely examined 3-year-olds. In order to investigate how future projections develop, we examined a total of 241 preschool children in three age groups (35-, 47-, and 55-month-olds). As expected, the results revealed a developmental progression with the older children outperforming their younger peers. The obtained results correspond to existing evidence using behavioral tasks, and thereby underscores the robustness of previous findings showing that the ability to project oneself into the future undergoes a marked development from 3 to 5 years of age. In addition, and more specifically, the results presented here when considered together with other evidence, may suggest a hitherto neglected developmental spurt from around 3.5- to 4-years of age in relation to episodic future thinking, calling for further research in this age range.",
keywords = "episodic memory, future projections, self, trip task",
author = "Svane, {Riikka Pauliina} and Toril Jensen and Hjuler, {Tirill Fjellhaugen} and Trine Sonne and Kingo, {Osman Skjold} and Peter Kr{\o}jgaard",
note = "This research was supported by the VELUX Foundation [VELUX 10386] and the Danish National Research Foundation [DNRF 89].",
year = "2021",
month = feb,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/19012276.2021.1873829",
language = "English",
journal = "Nordic Psychology (Online)",
issn = "1904-0016",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Episodic future thinking in 35-, 47-, and 55-month-old children

AU - Svane, Riikka Pauliina

AU - Jensen, Toril

AU - Hjuler, Tirill Fjellhaugen

AU - Sonne, Trine

AU - Kingo, Osman Skjold

AU - Krøjgaard, Peter

N1 - This research was supported by the VELUX Foundation [VELUX 10386] and the Danish National Research Foundation [DNRF 89].

PY - 2021/2/1

Y1 - 2021/2/1

N2 - The trip task has been used as a verbal test for examining preschool children’s episodic future thinking. However, the only existing study using the trip task merely examined 3-year-olds. In order to investigate how future projections develop, we examined a total of 241 preschool children in three age groups (35-, 47-, and 55-month-olds). As expected, the results revealed a developmental progression with the older children outperforming their younger peers. The obtained results correspond to existing evidence using behavioral tasks, and thereby underscores the robustness of previous findings showing that the ability to project oneself into the future undergoes a marked development from 3 to 5 years of age. In addition, and more specifically, the results presented here when considered together with other evidence, may suggest a hitherto neglected developmental spurt from around 3.5- to 4-years of age in relation to episodic future thinking, calling for further research in this age range.

AB - The trip task has been used as a verbal test for examining preschool children’s episodic future thinking. However, the only existing study using the trip task merely examined 3-year-olds. In order to investigate how future projections develop, we examined a total of 241 preschool children in three age groups (35-, 47-, and 55-month-olds). As expected, the results revealed a developmental progression with the older children outperforming their younger peers. The obtained results correspond to existing evidence using behavioral tasks, and thereby underscores the robustness of previous findings showing that the ability to project oneself into the future undergoes a marked development from 3 to 5 years of age. In addition, and more specifically, the results presented here when considered together with other evidence, may suggest a hitherto neglected developmental spurt from around 3.5- to 4-years of age in relation to episodic future thinking, calling for further research in this age range.

KW - episodic memory

KW - future projections

KW - self

KW - trip task

U2 - 10.1080/19012276.2021.1873829

DO - 10.1080/19012276.2021.1873829

M3 - Journal article

JO - Nordic Psychology (Online)

JF - Nordic Psychology (Online)

SN - 1904-0016

ER -