Institut for Forretningsudvikling og Teknologi

Energy transitions from the cradle to the grave: A meta-theoretical framework integrating responsible innovation, social practices, and energy justice

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DOI

  • Benjamin K. Sovacool
  • David J. Hess, Vanderbilt University
  • ,
  • Roberto Cantoni, University of Sussex Business School

An almost inexhaustible number of conceptual approaches has arisen in the past few decades to seek to explain the interlinked phenomena of energy transitions, low-carbon transitions, or sociotechnical change. With an eye for theoretical synthesis, this study asks: What do three particular epistemic communities—those concerning innovation, practices, and justice—say about energy transitions? What does this literature reveal about the injustices and inequalities of energy transitions? Finally, what can we learn by integrating aspects of this literature? The study answers these questions by drawing from responsible research and innovation, social practice theory, and energy justice approaches. Essentially the first is about the design of technology, the second how it is used, the third the broader societal and global implications. Taken together, the study offers an integrative framework capable of analyzing transitions from their “cradle” of design to their “life” of use to their “grave” of aftereffects. It explores the extent to which the three perspectives can be integrated into a meta-theoretical framework. This integrative framework is then applied to four diverse case studies: French nuclear power, Greek wind energy, Papua New Guinean solar energy, and Estonian oil shale.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer102027
TidsskriftEnergy Research and Social Science
Vol/bind75
Antal sider16
ISSN2214-6296
DOI
StatusUdgivet - maj 2021

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 884539 ?Carbon Intensive Regions in Transition - Unravelling the Challenges of Structural Change (CINTRAN)?. The content of this deliverable does not reflect the official opinion of the European Union. Responsibility for the information and views expressed herein lies entirely with the author(s). The authors also thank Jessica Jewell from Chalmers University and Lukas Hermwille from the Wuppertal Institute for helpful comments on earlier versions of this draft, along with three anonymous peer referees. Moreover, one of the authors of this paper (Sovacool) is the Editor-in-Chief for Energy Research & Social Science. He was not involved in managing the peer review or editorial process for this article.

Funding Information:
This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 884539 “Carbon Intensive Regions in Transition - Unravelling the Challenges of Structural Change (CINTRAN)”. The content of this deliverable does not reflect the official opinion of the European Union. Responsibility for the information and views expressed herein lies entirely with the author(s). The authors also thank Jessica Jewell from Chalmers University and Lukas Hermwille from the Wuppertal Institute for helpful comments on earlier versions of this draft, along with three anonymous peer referees. Moreover, one of the authors of this paper (Sovacool) is the Editor-in-Chief for Energy Research & Social Science . He was not involved in managing the peer review or editorial process for this article.

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© 2021 Elsevier Ltd

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