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Elite power in low-carbon transitions: A critical and interdisciplinary review

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Elite power in low-carbon transitions : A critical and interdisciplinary review. / Sovacool, Benjamin K.; Brisbois, Marie Claire.

I: Energy Research and Social Science, Bind 57, 101242, 11.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisReviewForskningpeer review

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Sovacool, Benjamin K. ; Brisbois, Marie Claire. / Elite power in low-carbon transitions : A critical and interdisciplinary review. I: Energy Research and Social Science. 2019 ; Bind 57.

Bibtex

@article{0999da9fcfc54b61a0a028920f218ac4,
title = "Elite power in low-carbon transitions: A critical and interdisciplinary review",
abstract = "Modern energy systems have tended towards centralized control by states, and national and multinational energy companies. This implicates the power of elites in realizing low-carbon transitions. In particular, low-carbon transitions can create, perpetuate, challenge, or entrench the power of elites. Using a critical lens that draws from geography, political science, innovation studies, and social justice theory (among others), this article explores the ways in which transitions can exacerbate, reconfigure or be shaped by “elite power.” It does so by offering a navigational approach that surveys a broad collection of diverse literatures on power. It begins by conceptualizing power across a range of academic disciplines, envisioning power as involving both agents (corrective influence) and structures (pervasive influence). It then elaborates different types of power and the interrelationship between different sources of power, with a specific focus on elites, including conceptualizing elite power, resisting elite power, and power frameworks. The Review then examines scholarship relevant to elite power in low-carbon transitions—including the multi-level perspective, Michel Foucault, Antonio Gramsci, Anthony Giddens, Karl Marx, and other contextual approaches—before offering future research directions. The Review concludes that the power relations inherent in low-carbon transitions are asymmetrical but promisingly unstable. By better grappling with power analytically, descriptively, and even normatively, socially just and sustainable energy futures become not only more desirable but also more possible.",
keywords = "Climate justice, Energy justice, Energy transitions, Political economy",
author = "Sovacool, {Benjamin K.} and Brisbois, {Marie Claire}",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.erss.2019.101242",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
journal = "Energy Research & Social Science",
issn = "2214-6296",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Elite power in low-carbon transitions

T2 - A critical and interdisciplinary review

AU - Sovacool, Benjamin K.

AU - Brisbois, Marie Claire

PY - 2019/11

Y1 - 2019/11

N2 - Modern energy systems have tended towards centralized control by states, and national and multinational energy companies. This implicates the power of elites in realizing low-carbon transitions. In particular, low-carbon transitions can create, perpetuate, challenge, or entrench the power of elites. Using a critical lens that draws from geography, political science, innovation studies, and social justice theory (among others), this article explores the ways in which transitions can exacerbate, reconfigure or be shaped by “elite power.” It does so by offering a navigational approach that surveys a broad collection of diverse literatures on power. It begins by conceptualizing power across a range of academic disciplines, envisioning power as involving both agents (corrective influence) and structures (pervasive influence). It then elaborates different types of power and the interrelationship between different sources of power, with a specific focus on elites, including conceptualizing elite power, resisting elite power, and power frameworks. The Review then examines scholarship relevant to elite power in low-carbon transitions—including the multi-level perspective, Michel Foucault, Antonio Gramsci, Anthony Giddens, Karl Marx, and other contextual approaches—before offering future research directions. The Review concludes that the power relations inherent in low-carbon transitions are asymmetrical but promisingly unstable. By better grappling with power analytically, descriptively, and even normatively, socially just and sustainable energy futures become not only more desirable but also more possible.

AB - Modern energy systems have tended towards centralized control by states, and national and multinational energy companies. This implicates the power of elites in realizing low-carbon transitions. In particular, low-carbon transitions can create, perpetuate, challenge, or entrench the power of elites. Using a critical lens that draws from geography, political science, innovation studies, and social justice theory (among others), this article explores the ways in which transitions can exacerbate, reconfigure or be shaped by “elite power.” It does so by offering a navigational approach that surveys a broad collection of diverse literatures on power. It begins by conceptualizing power across a range of academic disciplines, envisioning power as involving both agents (corrective influence) and structures (pervasive influence). It then elaborates different types of power and the interrelationship between different sources of power, with a specific focus on elites, including conceptualizing elite power, resisting elite power, and power frameworks. The Review then examines scholarship relevant to elite power in low-carbon transitions—including the multi-level perspective, Michel Foucault, Antonio Gramsci, Anthony Giddens, Karl Marx, and other contextual approaches—before offering future research directions. The Review concludes that the power relations inherent in low-carbon transitions are asymmetrical but promisingly unstable. By better grappling with power analytically, descriptively, and even normatively, socially just and sustainable energy futures become not only more desirable but also more possible.

KW - Climate justice

KW - Energy justice

KW - Energy transitions

KW - Political economy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071296599&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.erss.2019.101242

DO - 10.1016/j.erss.2019.101242

M3 - Review

AN - SCOPUS:85071296599

VL - 57

JO - Energy Research & Social Science

JF - Energy Research & Social Science

SN - 2214-6296

M1 - 101242

ER -