Electroconvulsive therapy following incident bipolar disorder: When, how and for whom?

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Objective: The use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD) remains poorly described. Based on data from Danish registries with complete nationwide coverage, this study of patients with incident BD aimed to describe when, how, and for whom ECT is used in the context of BD. Methods: We identified patients receiving their first diagnosis of BD in the period from 2008 to 2018, who subsequently received ECT. Descriptive statistics were used to clarify when, how, and for whom ECT is used. Results: We identified 1338 patients with incident BD who subsequently received ECT. The median age at the first ECT session was 50.6 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 26.4), and 62% of those treated with ECT were female. The median time from the diagnosis of BD to the first ECT treatment was 0.6 years (IQR: 2.6), and 58% of the patients receiving ECT had the first treatment within the first year after being diagnosed with BD. The most common indication for the first ECT treatment was depression (mainly non-psychotic depression), followed by mania (mainly psychotic mania). The first ECT session was typically provided to inpatients (97%), upon patient consent (98%) and with bilateral electrode placement (60%). Conclusions: A substantial proportion of the patients with incident BD who receive ECT require this treatment within the first year after the diagnosis. The most common indication for ECT is depression followed by (psychotic) mania. Inpatient voluntary ECT using bilateral electrode placement is the most common form of administration.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBipolar disorders
Vol/bind24
Nummer8
Sider (fra-til)817-825
Antal sider9
ISSN1399-5618
DOI
StatusUdgivet - dec. 2022

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