Effect of 12 weeks continuous positive airway pressure on day and night arterial stiffness and blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea: A randomized controlled trial

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DOI

  • Christoffer Krogager
  • Anne Margareta Banghøj, Department of Cardiology, Nephrology and Endocrinology, Nordsjællands University Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Per L Poulsen
  • Martin G Kirkegaard, Sleep Disorders Clinic, Elective Surgery Centre, Regional Hospital Silkeborg, Silkeborg, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Birger Thorsteinsson, d Department of Clinical Medicine , Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark.
  • ,
  • Lise Tarnow, Department of Cardiology, Nephrology and Endocrinology, Nordsjællands University Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark., Steno Diabetes Center Zealand, Holbaek, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Klavs W Hansen, Diagnostic Centre, Silkeborg Regional Hospital, Silkeborg, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Esben Laugesen

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of continuous positive airway pressure treatment on pulse wave velocity and blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea. A randomized controlled study was performed, including 72 patients with type 2 diabetes and newly diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea recruited from outpatient clinics at three Danish hospitals. The patients were randomized to continuous positive airway pressure for 12 weeks or no continuous positive airway pressure. Office measurements were performed at baseline, 4 weeks and 12 weeks. At baseline and 12 weeks, a 24-hr measurement of pulse wave velocity and blood pressure was performed. No significant change was observed in the primary outcome variable of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measured with SphygmoCor. With the Mobil-O-Graph, changes in office pulse wave velocity between the groups were significant: 0.3 m/s; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.6; p = .02. The group receiving continuous positive airway pressure had a larger decrease in pulse wave velocity than controls but none of the changes within the groups were significant. No significant change in ambulatory blood pressure was observed in any of the two groups after 12 weeks. In conclusion, continuous positive airway pressure treatment for 12 weeks does not significantly reduce pulse wave velocity or blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummere12978
TidsskriftJournal of Sleep Research
Vol/bind29
Nummer4
Antal sider11
ISSN1365-2869
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 aug. 2020

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© 2020 European Sleep Research Society.

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