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Early procedural training increases anesthesiology residents’ clinical production: a comparative pre-post study of the payoff in clinical training

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Early procedural training increases anesthesiology residents’ clinical production : a comparative pre-post study of the payoff in clinical training. / Bisgaard, Claus Hedebo; Rodt, Svein Aage; Musaeus, Peter; Petersen, Jens Aage Kølsen; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck.

I: BMC Medical Education, Bind 21, 262, 06.2021.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{3d3420e5a527426ca40be5175622d601,
title = "Early procedural training increases anesthesiology residents{\textquoteright} clinical production: a comparative pre-post study of the payoff in clinical training",
abstract = "Background: Competency-based education has been shown to enhance clinical skills, improve patient care, and reduce number of complications resulting in a better return on investments. Residents constitute an important workforce at many hospitals. Yet, the effect of training on residents{\textquoteright} contribution to production in patient care is scarcely studied. This study evaluated the effects of early competency-based procedural training on residents{\textquoteright} contribution to patient care in central venous catheterization and spinal and epidural anesthesia. Methods: The design was a non-randomized cohort study of first-year anesthesiology residents. The intervention group received additional early focused skills training while three control groups received traditional competency-based education. The residents{\textquoteright} contributions to patient care were compared between the intervention group (n = 20), a historical control group (n = 19), and between a contemporary control group (n = 7) and a historical control group (n = 7) from different departments. The residents{\textquoteright} vs specialists{\textquoteright} procedural production share was compared between years within each study group. We calculated specialist time saved compared to the time spent providing additional skills training in the intervention group. Results: We found statistically significant increases in residents{\textquoteright} vs specialists{\textquoteright} share of total production after the intervention for epidural anesthesia: 2015: 0.51 (0.23, 0.70) to 2017: 0.94 (0.78, 1.05), p = 0.011 and central venous catheterization: 2015: 0.30 (0.23, 0.36) to 2016: 0.46 (0.35, 0.55), p =.008; and to 2017: 0.64 (0.50, 0.79), p = 0.008. Comparison between residents and specialists on production of the three procedures before and after the intervention showed a surplus of 21 h of freed specialist time per year. Conclusions: Early procedural training results in more productive residents and freed specialist time for additional supervision, other clinical tasks or research. This provides empirical support for a positive correlation between early focused training and increased independent production among residents.",
author = "Bisgaard, {Claus Hedebo} and Rodt, {Svein Aage} and Peter Musaeus and Petersen, {Jens Aage K{\o}lsen} and Rubak, {Sune Leisgaard M{\o}rck}",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021, The Author(s). Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = jun,
doi = "10.1186/s12909-021-02693-w",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
journal = "B M C Medical Education",
issn = "1472-6920",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early procedural training increases anesthesiology residents’ clinical production

T2 - a comparative pre-post study of the payoff in clinical training

AU - Bisgaard, Claus Hedebo

AU - Rodt, Svein Aage

AU - Musaeus, Peter

AU - Petersen, Jens Aage Kølsen

AU - Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2021, The Author(s). Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/6

Y1 - 2021/6

N2 - Background: Competency-based education has been shown to enhance clinical skills, improve patient care, and reduce number of complications resulting in a better return on investments. Residents constitute an important workforce at many hospitals. Yet, the effect of training on residents’ contribution to production in patient care is scarcely studied. This study evaluated the effects of early competency-based procedural training on residents’ contribution to patient care in central venous catheterization and spinal and epidural anesthesia. Methods: The design was a non-randomized cohort study of first-year anesthesiology residents. The intervention group received additional early focused skills training while three control groups received traditional competency-based education. The residents’ contributions to patient care were compared between the intervention group (n = 20), a historical control group (n = 19), and between a contemporary control group (n = 7) and a historical control group (n = 7) from different departments. The residents’ vs specialists’ procedural production share was compared between years within each study group. We calculated specialist time saved compared to the time spent providing additional skills training in the intervention group. Results: We found statistically significant increases in residents’ vs specialists’ share of total production after the intervention for epidural anesthesia: 2015: 0.51 (0.23, 0.70) to 2017: 0.94 (0.78, 1.05), p = 0.011 and central venous catheterization: 2015: 0.30 (0.23, 0.36) to 2016: 0.46 (0.35, 0.55), p =.008; and to 2017: 0.64 (0.50, 0.79), p = 0.008. Comparison between residents and specialists on production of the three procedures before and after the intervention showed a surplus of 21 h of freed specialist time per year. Conclusions: Early procedural training results in more productive residents and freed specialist time for additional supervision, other clinical tasks or research. This provides empirical support for a positive correlation between early focused training and increased independent production among residents.

AB - Background: Competency-based education has been shown to enhance clinical skills, improve patient care, and reduce number of complications resulting in a better return on investments. Residents constitute an important workforce at many hospitals. Yet, the effect of training on residents’ contribution to production in patient care is scarcely studied. This study evaluated the effects of early competency-based procedural training on residents’ contribution to patient care in central venous catheterization and spinal and epidural anesthesia. Methods: The design was a non-randomized cohort study of first-year anesthesiology residents. The intervention group received additional early focused skills training while three control groups received traditional competency-based education. The residents’ contributions to patient care were compared between the intervention group (n = 20), a historical control group (n = 19), and between a contemporary control group (n = 7) and a historical control group (n = 7) from different departments. The residents’ vs specialists’ procedural production share was compared between years within each study group. We calculated specialist time saved compared to the time spent providing additional skills training in the intervention group. Results: We found statistically significant increases in residents’ vs specialists’ share of total production after the intervention for epidural anesthesia: 2015: 0.51 (0.23, 0.70) to 2017: 0.94 (0.78, 1.05), p = 0.011 and central venous catheterization: 2015: 0.30 (0.23, 0.36) to 2016: 0.46 (0.35, 0.55), p =.008; and to 2017: 0.64 (0.50, 0.79), p = 0.008. Comparison between residents and specialists on production of the three procedures before and after the intervention showed a surplus of 21 h of freed specialist time per year. Conclusions: Early procedural training results in more productive residents and freed specialist time for additional supervision, other clinical tasks or research. This provides empirical support for a positive correlation between early focused training and increased independent production among residents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85105534683&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12909-021-02693-w

DO - 10.1186/s12909-021-02693-w

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33957915

AN - SCOPUS:85105534683

VL - 21

JO - B M C Medical Education

JF - B M C Medical Education

SN - 1472-6920

M1 - 262

ER -