Dolphin echolocation behaviour during active long-range target approaches

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  • Michael Ladegaard
  • Jason Mulsow, National Marine Mammal Foundation, 2240 Shelter Island Drive, Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92106, USA.
  • ,
  • Dorian S Houser, National Marine Mammal Foundation, 2240 Shelter Island Drive, Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92106, USA.
  • ,
  • Frants Havmand Jensen
  • ,
  • Mark Johnson
  • Peter Teglberg Madsen
  • James J Finneran, United States Navy Marine Mammal Program, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, Code 71510, 53560 Hull Street, San Diego, CA 92152, USA.

Echolocating toothed whales generally adjust click intensity and rate according to target range to ensure that echoes from targets of interest arrive before a subsequent click is produced, presumably facilitating range estimation from the delay between clicks and returning echoes. However, this click-echo-click paradigm for the dolphin biosonar is mostly based on experiments with stationary animals echolocating fixed targets at ranges below ∼120 m. Therefore, we trained two bottlenose dolphins instrumented with a sound recording tag to approach a target from ranges up to 400 m and either touch the target (subject TRO) or detect a target orientation change (subject SAY). We show that free-swimming dolphins dynamically increase interclick interval (ICI) out to target ranges of ∼100 m. TRO consistently kept ICIs above the two-way travel time (TWTT) for target ranges shorter than ∼100 m, whereas SAY switched between clicking at ICIs above and below the TWTT for target ranges down to ∼25 m. Source levels changed on average by 17log10(target range), but with considerable variation for individual slopes (4.1 standard deviations for by-trial random effects), demonstrating that dolphins do not adopt a fixed automatic gain control matched to target range. At target ranges exceeding ∼100 m, both dolphins frequently switched to click packet production in which interpacket intervals exceeded the TWTT, but ICIs were shorter than the TWTT. We conclude that the click-echo-click paradigm is not a fixed echolocation strategy in dolphins, and we demonstrate the first use of click packets for free-swimming dolphins when solving an echolocation task.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer189217
TidsskriftThe Journal of Experimental Biology
Vol/bind222
Nummer2
ISSN0022-0949
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 25 jan. 2019

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© 2019. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

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