Institut for Statskundskab

Do parties matter for local revenue policies? A comparison of Denmark and Norway

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Standard

Do parties matter for local revenue policies? A comparison of Denmark and Norway. / Blom-Hansen, Jens; Monkerud, Lars Christian; Sørensen, Rune.

I: European Journal of Political Research, Bind 45, 2006, s. 445-465.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Blom-Hansen, J, Monkerud, LC & Sørensen, R 2006, 'Do parties matter for local revenue policies? A comparison of Denmark and Norway', European Journal of Political Research, bind 45, s. 445-465.

APA

Blom-Hansen, J., Monkerud, L. C., & Sørensen, R. (2006). Do parties matter for local revenue policies? A comparison of Denmark and Norway. European Journal of Political Research, 45, 445-465.

CBE

Blom-Hansen J, Monkerud LC, Sørensen R. 2006. Do parties matter for local revenue policies? A comparison of Denmark and Norway. European Journal of Political Research. 45:445-465.

MLA

Blom-Hansen, Jens, Lars Christian Monkerud og Rune Sørensen. "Do parties matter for local revenue policies? A comparison of Denmark and Norway". European Journal of Political Research. 2006, 45. 445-465.

Vancouver

Blom-Hansen J, Monkerud LC, Sørensen R. Do parties matter for local revenue policies? A comparison of Denmark and Norway. European Journal of Political Research. 2006;45:445-465.

Author

Blom-Hansen, Jens ; Monkerud, Lars Christian ; Sørensen, Rune. / Do parties matter for local revenue policies? A comparison of Denmark and Norway. I: European Journal of Political Research. 2006 ; Bind 45. s. 445-465.

Bibtex

@article{f8b552c0eaf911dabee902004c4f4f50,
title = "Do parties matter for local revenue policies? A comparison of Denmark and Norway",
abstract = "This paper investigates the impact of party ideology on revenue politics. Theoretically, claims can be made that party ideology should matter for revenue policies. First, leftist governments are more favorable towards government intervention and a large public sector. To accomplish this, leftist governments need more revenue than bourgeois governments. Second, revenue policy is a redistributive policy area well suited for ideological positioning. However, the claim that party ideology does not matter can also be made since raising revenue is unpopular, and politicians may shy away from new initiatives. Empirically, the question is unsettled. The paper investigates the problem by looking at three revenue policy areas (income and property taxation and user charges) in two countries (Denmark and Norway). It uses data from the municipal level and thus has several hundreds of units to compare. The evidence favors the {"}parties-matter{"}-argument, particularly in the Danish case.",
author = "Jens Blom-Hansen and Monkerud, {Lars Christian} and Rune S{\o}rensen",
year = "2006",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "445--465",
journal = "European Journal of Political Research",
issn = "0304-4130",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do parties matter for local revenue policies? A comparison of Denmark and Norway

AU - Blom-Hansen, Jens

AU - Monkerud, Lars Christian

AU - Sørensen, Rune

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - This paper investigates the impact of party ideology on revenue politics. Theoretically, claims can be made that party ideology should matter for revenue policies. First, leftist governments are more favorable towards government intervention and a large public sector. To accomplish this, leftist governments need more revenue than bourgeois governments. Second, revenue policy is a redistributive policy area well suited for ideological positioning. However, the claim that party ideology does not matter can also be made since raising revenue is unpopular, and politicians may shy away from new initiatives. Empirically, the question is unsettled. The paper investigates the problem by looking at three revenue policy areas (income and property taxation and user charges) in two countries (Denmark and Norway). It uses data from the municipal level and thus has several hundreds of units to compare. The evidence favors the "parties-matter"-argument, particularly in the Danish case.

AB - This paper investigates the impact of party ideology on revenue politics. Theoretically, claims can be made that party ideology should matter for revenue policies. First, leftist governments are more favorable towards government intervention and a large public sector. To accomplish this, leftist governments need more revenue than bourgeois governments. Second, revenue policy is a redistributive policy area well suited for ideological positioning. However, the claim that party ideology does not matter can also be made since raising revenue is unpopular, and politicians may shy away from new initiatives. Empirically, the question is unsettled. The paper investigates the problem by looking at three revenue policy areas (income and property taxation and user charges) in two countries (Denmark and Norway). It uses data from the municipal level and thus has several hundreds of units to compare. The evidence favors the "parties-matter"-argument, particularly in the Danish case.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 45

SP - 445

EP - 465

JO - European Journal of Political Research

JF - European Journal of Political Research

SN - 0304-4130

ER -