Comparing surf lifeguards and nurse anesthetists’ use of the i-gel supraglottic airway device – An observational simulation study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Standard

Comparing surf lifeguards and nurse anesthetists’ use of the i-gel supraglottic airway device – An observational simulation study. / Nørkjær, Louise; Stærk, Mathilde; Lauridsen, Kasper G.; Gallacher, Tabita K.; Løyche, Jakob B.; Krogh, Kristian; Løfgren, Bo.

I: Open Access Emergency Medicine, Bind 12, 2020, s. 73-79.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{417e96fa9589434097254abcb776ea22,
title = "Comparing surf lifeguards and nurse anesthetists{\textquoteright} use of the i-gel supraglottic airway device – An observational simulation study",
abstract = "Purpose: Using a supraglottic airway (SGA) may provide more effective ventilations compared with a mouth-to-pocket-mask for drowning victims. SGAs are widely used by nurse anesthetists but it is unknown whether surf lifeguards can use SGAs effectively. We aimed to compare the use of SGA by surf lifeguards and experienced nurse anesthetists. Materials and Methods: Surf lifeguards inserted a SGA (i-gel O2, size 4) in a resuscitation manikin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and nurse anesthetists inserted a SGA in a resuscitation manikin placed on a bed, and performed ventilations. Outcome measures: time to first ventilation, tidal volume, proportion of ventilations with visible manikin chest rise, and ventilations within the recommended tidal volume (0.5–0.6 L). Results: Overall, 30 surf lifeguards and 30 nurse anesthetists participated. Median (Q1–Q3) time to first ventilation was 20 s (15–22) for surf lifeguards and 17 s (15–21) for nurse anesthetists (p=0.31). Mean (SD) tidal volume was 0.55 L (0.21) for surf lifeguards and 0.31 L (0.10) for nurse anesthetists (p<0.0001). Surf lifeguards and nurse anesthetists delivered 100% and 95% ventilations with visible manikin chest rise (p=0.004) and 19% and 5% ventilations within the recommended tidal volume, respectively (p<0.0001). Conclusion: In a simulated setting, there was no significant difference between surf lifeguards and experienced nurse anesthetists in time to first ventilation when using a SGA. Surf lifeguards delivered a higher tidal volume, and a higher proportion of ventilations within guideline recommendations, but generally ventilations caused visible manikin chest rise for both groups.",
keywords = "Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Drowning, Nurse anesthetists, Supraglottic airway, Surf lifeguards, Ventilation",
author = "Louise N{\o}rkj{\ae}r and Mathilde St{\ae}rk and Lauridsen, {Kasper G.} and Gallacher, {Tabita K.} and L{\o}yche, {Jakob B.} and Kristian Krogh and Bo L{\o}fgren",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.2147/OAEM.S239040",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "73--79",
journal = "Open access emergency medicine : OAEM",
issn = "1179-1500",
publisher = "Dove Medical Press Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing surf lifeguards and nurse anesthetists’ use of the i-gel supraglottic airway device – An observational simulation study

AU - Nørkjær, Louise

AU - Stærk, Mathilde

AU - Lauridsen, Kasper G.

AU - Gallacher, Tabita K.

AU - Løyche, Jakob B.

AU - Krogh, Kristian

AU - Løfgren, Bo

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Purpose: Using a supraglottic airway (SGA) may provide more effective ventilations compared with a mouth-to-pocket-mask for drowning victims. SGAs are widely used by nurse anesthetists but it is unknown whether surf lifeguards can use SGAs effectively. We aimed to compare the use of SGA by surf lifeguards and experienced nurse anesthetists. Materials and Methods: Surf lifeguards inserted a SGA (i-gel O2, size 4) in a resuscitation manikin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and nurse anesthetists inserted a SGA in a resuscitation manikin placed on a bed, and performed ventilations. Outcome measures: time to first ventilation, tidal volume, proportion of ventilations with visible manikin chest rise, and ventilations within the recommended tidal volume (0.5–0.6 L). Results: Overall, 30 surf lifeguards and 30 nurse anesthetists participated. Median (Q1–Q3) time to first ventilation was 20 s (15–22) for surf lifeguards and 17 s (15–21) for nurse anesthetists (p=0.31). Mean (SD) tidal volume was 0.55 L (0.21) for surf lifeguards and 0.31 L (0.10) for nurse anesthetists (p<0.0001). Surf lifeguards and nurse anesthetists delivered 100% and 95% ventilations with visible manikin chest rise (p=0.004) and 19% and 5% ventilations within the recommended tidal volume, respectively (p<0.0001). Conclusion: In a simulated setting, there was no significant difference between surf lifeguards and experienced nurse anesthetists in time to first ventilation when using a SGA. Surf lifeguards delivered a higher tidal volume, and a higher proportion of ventilations within guideline recommendations, but generally ventilations caused visible manikin chest rise for both groups.

AB - Purpose: Using a supraglottic airway (SGA) may provide more effective ventilations compared with a mouth-to-pocket-mask for drowning victims. SGAs are widely used by nurse anesthetists but it is unknown whether surf lifeguards can use SGAs effectively. We aimed to compare the use of SGA by surf lifeguards and experienced nurse anesthetists. Materials and Methods: Surf lifeguards inserted a SGA (i-gel O2, size 4) in a resuscitation manikin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and nurse anesthetists inserted a SGA in a resuscitation manikin placed on a bed, and performed ventilations. Outcome measures: time to first ventilation, tidal volume, proportion of ventilations with visible manikin chest rise, and ventilations within the recommended tidal volume (0.5–0.6 L). Results: Overall, 30 surf lifeguards and 30 nurse anesthetists participated. Median (Q1–Q3) time to first ventilation was 20 s (15–22) for surf lifeguards and 17 s (15–21) for nurse anesthetists (p=0.31). Mean (SD) tidal volume was 0.55 L (0.21) for surf lifeguards and 0.31 L (0.10) for nurse anesthetists (p<0.0001). Surf lifeguards and nurse anesthetists delivered 100% and 95% ventilations with visible manikin chest rise (p=0.004) and 19% and 5% ventilations within the recommended tidal volume, respectively (p<0.0001). Conclusion: In a simulated setting, there was no significant difference between surf lifeguards and experienced nurse anesthetists in time to first ventilation when using a SGA. Surf lifeguards delivered a higher tidal volume, and a higher proportion of ventilations within guideline recommendations, but generally ventilations caused visible manikin chest rise for both groups.

KW - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation

KW - Drowning

KW - Nurse anesthetists

KW - Supraglottic airway

KW - Surf lifeguards

KW - Ventilation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85083177585&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2147/OAEM.S239040

DO - 10.2147/OAEM.S239040

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32308509

AN - SCOPUS:85083177585

VL - 12

SP - 73

EP - 79

JO - Open access emergency medicine : OAEM

JF - Open access emergency medicine : OAEM

SN - 1179-1500

ER -