Comparing spatial diversification and meta-population models in the Indo-Australian Archipelago

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Comparing spatial diversification and meta-population models in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. / Chalmandrier, Loic; Albouy, Camille; Descombes, Patrice; Sandel, Brody; Faurby, Soren; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Pellissier, Loic.

I: Royal Society Open Science, Bind 5, 171366, 03.2018.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Chalmandrier, L, Albouy, C, Descombes, P, Sandel, B, Faurby, S, Svenning, J-C, Zimmermann, NE & Pellissier, L 2018, 'Comparing spatial diversification and meta-population models in the Indo-Australian Archipelago', Royal Society Open Science, bind 5, 171366. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.171366

APA

Chalmandrier, L., Albouy, C., Descombes, P., Sandel, B., Faurby, S., Svenning, J-C., ... Pellissier, L. (2018). Comparing spatial diversification and meta-population models in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Royal Society Open Science, 5, [171366]. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.171366

CBE

Chalmandrier L, Albouy C, Descombes P, Sandel B, Faurby S, Svenning J-C, Zimmermann NE, Pellissier L. 2018. Comparing spatial diversification and meta-population models in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Royal Society Open Science. 5. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.171366

MLA

Vancouver

Chalmandrier L, Albouy C, Descombes P, Sandel B, Faurby S, Svenning J-C o.a. Comparing spatial diversification and meta-population models in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Royal Society Open Science. 2018 mar;5. 171366. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.171366

Author

Chalmandrier, Loic ; Albouy, Camille ; Descombes, Patrice ; Sandel, Brody ; Faurby, Soren ; Svenning, Jens-Christian ; Zimmermann, Niklaus E. ; Pellissier, Loic. / Comparing spatial diversification and meta-population models in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. I: Royal Society Open Science. 2018 ; Bind 5.

Bibtex

@article{eb1b80bd737e485eac4fe761c4769e5c,
title = "Comparing spatial diversification and meta-population models in the Indo-Australian Archipelago",
abstract = "Reconstructing the processes that have shaped the emergence of biodiversity gradients is critical to understand the dynamics of diversification of life on Earth. Islands have traditionally been used as model systems to unravel the processes shaping biological diversity. MacArthur and Wilson's island biogeographic model predicts diversity to be based on dynamic interactions between colonization and extinction rates, while treating islands themselves as geologically static entities. The current spatial configuration of islands should influence meta-population dynamics, but long-term geological changes within archipelagos are also expected to have shaped island biodiversity, in part by driving diversification. Here, we compare two mechanistic models providing inferences on species richness at a biogeographic scale: a mechanistic spatial-temporal model of species diversification and a spatial meta-population model. While the meta-population model operates over a static landscape, the diversification model is driven by changes in the size and spatial configuration of islands through time. We compare the inferences of both models to floristic diversity patterns among land patches of the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Simulation results from the diversification model better matched observed diversity than a meta-population model constrained only by the contemporary landscape. The diversification model suggests that the dynamic repositioning of islands promoting land disconnection and reconnection induced an accumulation of particularly high species diversity on Borneo, which is central within the island network. By contrast, the meta-population model predicts a higher diversity on the mainlands, which is less compatible with empirical data. Our analyses highlight that, by comparing models with contrasting assumptions, we can pinpoint the processes that are most compatible with extant biodiversity patterns.",
keywords = "allopatric speciation, continental drift, dispersal, diversification, meta-population model, neutral model, SPECIES RICHNESS, ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHY, PLATE-TECTONICS, FISH DIVERSITY, CLIMATE-CHANGE, BIODIVERSITY, EVOLUTION, PATTERNS, ECOLOGY, SPECIATION",
author = "Loic Chalmandrier and Camille Albouy and Patrice Descombes and Brody Sandel and Soren Faurby and Jens-Christian Svenning and Zimmermann, {Niklaus E.} and Loic Pellissier",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1098/rsos.171366",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
journal = "Royal Society Open Science",
issn = "2054-5703",
publisher = "ROYAL SOC",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing spatial diversification and meta-population models in the Indo-Australian Archipelago

AU - Chalmandrier, Loic

AU - Albouy, Camille

AU - Descombes, Patrice

AU - Sandel, Brody

AU - Faurby, Soren

AU - Svenning, Jens-Christian

AU - Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

AU - Pellissier, Loic

PY - 2018/3

Y1 - 2018/3

N2 - Reconstructing the processes that have shaped the emergence of biodiversity gradients is critical to understand the dynamics of diversification of life on Earth. Islands have traditionally been used as model systems to unravel the processes shaping biological diversity. MacArthur and Wilson's island biogeographic model predicts diversity to be based on dynamic interactions between colonization and extinction rates, while treating islands themselves as geologically static entities. The current spatial configuration of islands should influence meta-population dynamics, but long-term geological changes within archipelagos are also expected to have shaped island biodiversity, in part by driving diversification. Here, we compare two mechanistic models providing inferences on species richness at a biogeographic scale: a mechanistic spatial-temporal model of species diversification and a spatial meta-population model. While the meta-population model operates over a static landscape, the diversification model is driven by changes in the size and spatial configuration of islands through time. We compare the inferences of both models to floristic diversity patterns among land patches of the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Simulation results from the diversification model better matched observed diversity than a meta-population model constrained only by the contemporary landscape. The diversification model suggests that the dynamic repositioning of islands promoting land disconnection and reconnection induced an accumulation of particularly high species diversity on Borneo, which is central within the island network. By contrast, the meta-population model predicts a higher diversity on the mainlands, which is less compatible with empirical data. Our analyses highlight that, by comparing models with contrasting assumptions, we can pinpoint the processes that are most compatible with extant biodiversity patterns.

AB - Reconstructing the processes that have shaped the emergence of biodiversity gradients is critical to understand the dynamics of diversification of life on Earth. Islands have traditionally been used as model systems to unravel the processes shaping biological diversity. MacArthur and Wilson's island biogeographic model predicts diversity to be based on dynamic interactions between colonization and extinction rates, while treating islands themselves as geologically static entities. The current spatial configuration of islands should influence meta-population dynamics, but long-term geological changes within archipelagos are also expected to have shaped island biodiversity, in part by driving diversification. Here, we compare two mechanistic models providing inferences on species richness at a biogeographic scale: a mechanistic spatial-temporal model of species diversification and a spatial meta-population model. While the meta-population model operates over a static landscape, the diversification model is driven by changes in the size and spatial configuration of islands through time. We compare the inferences of both models to floristic diversity patterns among land patches of the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Simulation results from the diversification model better matched observed diversity than a meta-population model constrained only by the contemporary landscape. The diversification model suggests that the dynamic repositioning of islands promoting land disconnection and reconnection induced an accumulation of particularly high species diversity on Borneo, which is central within the island network. By contrast, the meta-population model predicts a higher diversity on the mainlands, which is less compatible with empirical data. Our analyses highlight that, by comparing models with contrasting assumptions, we can pinpoint the processes that are most compatible with extant biodiversity patterns.

KW - allopatric speciation

KW - continental drift

KW - dispersal

KW - diversification

KW - meta-population model

KW - neutral model

KW - SPECIES RICHNESS

KW - ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHY

KW - PLATE-TECTONICS

KW - FISH DIVERSITY

KW - CLIMATE-CHANGE

KW - BIODIVERSITY

KW - EVOLUTION

KW - PATTERNS

KW - ECOLOGY

KW - SPECIATION

U2 - 10.1098/rsos.171366

DO - 10.1098/rsos.171366

M3 - Journal article

VL - 5

JO - Royal Society Open Science

JF - Royal Society Open Science

SN - 2054-5703

M1 - 171366

ER -