Aarhus Universitets segl

Comorbidity between types of eating disorder and general medical conditions

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  • Natalie C Momen
  • Oleguer Plana-Ripoll
  • Cynthia M Bulik, Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Dept Phys & Astron
  • ,
  • John J McGrath
  • Laura M Thornton, Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Dept Phys & Astron
  • ,
  • Zeynep Yilmaz
  • Liselotte Vogdrup Petersen

BACKGROUND: Comorbidity with general medical conditions is common in individuals with eating disorders. Many previous studies do not evaluate types of eating disorder.

AIMS: To provide relative and absolute risks of bidirectional associations between (a) anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and eating disorders not otherwise specified and (b) 12 general medical conditions.

METHOD: We included all people born in Denmark between 1977 and 2010. We collected information on eating disorders and considered the risk of subsequent medical conditions, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Absolute risks were calculated using competing risks survival analyses. We also considered risks for prior medical conditions and subsequent eating disorders.

RESULTS: An increased risk was seen for almost all disorder pairs (69 of 70). Hazard ratios for those with a prior eating disorder receiving a subsequent diagnosis of a medical condition ranged from 0.94 (95% CI 0.57-1.55) to 2.05 (95% CI 1.86-2.27). For those with a prior medical condition, hazard ratios for later eating disorders ranged from 1.35 (95% CI 1.26-1.45) to 1.98 (95% CI 1.71-2.28). Absolute risks for most later disorders were increased for persons with prior disorders, compared with reference groups.

CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest and most detailed examination of eating disorder-medical condition comorbidity. The findings indicate that medical condition comorbidity is increased among those with eating disorders and vice versa. Although there was some variation in comorbidity observed across eating disorder types, magnitudes of relative risks did not differ greatly.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Vol/bind220
Nummer5
Sider (fra-til)279-286
Antal sider8
ISSN0007-1250
DOI
StatusUdgivet - maj 2022

Se relationer på Aarhus Universitet Citationsformater

ID: 230187883