Chemosensory function and food preferences among haemodialysis patients

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INTRODUCTION: Malnutrition and disturbed sense of smell and taste frequently occur in patients treated with chronic haemodialysis. The common denominator between chemosensation and nutrition may be food preferences. Our aim was to investigate smell and taste function as well as food preferences among haemodialysis patients and compare the results with those of age-matched controls.

METHODS: An observational case-control study was conducted on 29 patients on chronic haemodialysis and 39 age-matched healthy controls. Chemosensory function was evaluated using validated gustatory and olfactory tests. Food preferences were recorded using a questionnaire of 63 items including a five-point Likert scale of familiarity, liking and frequency.

RESULTS: Chemosensory function was significantly poorer among patients than among controls. Patients had significantly lower familiarity and frequency of consumptions of all food categories than controls and they also had significantly lower liking of vegetables, fruits and starches.

CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of the provided knowledge about haemodialysis patients' smell and taste function including their food preferences are suggested, such as enhancement of odorant intensity, use of taste amplification, cooking habits and exposure to more varied food items. Assessments of food preferences and chemosensory function prior to determination of individual dietary schedules are therefore recommended.

FUNDING: The authors did not receive any financial support for the research or drafting of this article. The authors declare that they have no financial interests to report.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: Danish Ethical Committee project number: M-2018-188-18.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
ArtikelnummerA08210644
TidsskriftDanish Medical Journal
Vol/bind69
Nummer11
Antal sider9
ISSN2245-1919
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2022

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