Can we predict ectotherm responses to climate change using thermal performance curves and body temperatures?

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Standard

Can we predict ectotherm responses to climate change using thermal performance curves and body temperatures? / Sinclair, Brent J.; Marshall, Katie E.; Sewell, Mary A.; Levesque, Danielle L.; Willett, Christopher S.; Slotsbo, Stine; Dong, Yunwei; Harley, Christopher D. G.; Marshall, David J.; Helmuth, Brian S.; Huey, Raymond B.

I: Ecology Letters, Bind 19, Nr. 11, 11.2016, s. 1372-1385.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisReviewForskningpeer review

Harvard

Sinclair, BJ, Marshall, KE, Sewell, MA, Levesque, DL, Willett, CS, Slotsbo, S, Dong, Y, Harley, CDG, Marshall, DJ, Helmuth, BS & Huey, RB 2016, 'Can we predict ectotherm responses to climate change using thermal performance curves and body temperatures?', Ecology Letters, bind 19, nr. 11, s. 1372-1385. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12686

APA

Sinclair, B. J., Marshall, K. E., Sewell, M. A., Levesque, D. L., Willett, C. S., Slotsbo, S., Dong, Y., Harley, C. D. G., Marshall, D. J., Helmuth, B. S., & Huey, R. B. (2016). Can we predict ectotherm responses to climate change using thermal performance curves and body temperatures? Ecology Letters, 19(11), 1372-1385. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12686

CBE

Sinclair BJ, Marshall KE, Sewell MA, Levesque DL, Willett CS, Slotsbo S, Dong Y, Harley CDG, Marshall DJ, Helmuth BS, Huey RB. 2016. Can we predict ectotherm responses to climate change using thermal performance curves and body temperatures?. Ecology Letters. 19(11):1372-1385. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12686

MLA

Vancouver

Sinclair BJ, Marshall KE, Sewell MA, Levesque DL, Willett CS, Slotsbo S o.a. Can we predict ectotherm responses to climate change using thermal performance curves and body temperatures? Ecology Letters. 2016 nov;19(11):1372-1385. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12686

Author

Sinclair, Brent J. ; Marshall, Katie E. ; Sewell, Mary A. ; Levesque, Danielle L. ; Willett, Christopher S. ; Slotsbo, Stine ; Dong, Yunwei ; Harley, Christopher D. G. ; Marshall, David J. ; Helmuth, Brian S. ; Huey, Raymond B. / Can we predict ectotherm responses to climate change using thermal performance curves and body temperatures?. I: Ecology Letters. 2016 ; Bind 19, Nr. 11. s. 1372-1385.

Bibtex

@article{c0e60cf70b0d498998f076b2e4424826,
title = "Can we predict ectotherm responses to climate change using thermal performance curves and body temperatures?",
abstract = "Thermal performance curves (TPCs), which quantify how an ectotherm's body temperature (T-b) affects its performance or fitness, are often used in an attempt to predict organismal responses to climate change. Here, we examine the key - but often biologically unreasonable - assumptions underlying this approach; for example, that physiology and thermal regimes are invariant over ontogeny, space and time, and also that TPCs are independent of previously experienced T-b. We show how a critical consideration of these assumptions can lead to biologically useful hypotheses and experimental designs. For example, rather than assuming that TPCs are fixed during ontogeny, one can measure TPCs for each major life stage and incorporate these into stage-specific ecological models to reveal the life stage most likely to be vulnerable to climate change. Our overall goal is to explicitly examine the assumptions underlying the integration of TPCs with T-b, to develop a framework within which empiricists can place their work within these limitations, and to facilitate the application of thermal physiology to understanding the biological implications of climate change.",
keywords = "Body temperature, climate change, fitness, thermal performance, thermal variability, PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE, THERMOREGULATORY BEHAVIOR, TERRESTRIAL ECTOTHERMS, FITNESS CONSEQUENCES, EXTREME TEMPERATURES, JENSENS INEQUALITY, ONCORHYNCHUS-NERKA, HABITAT SELECTION, SOCKEYE-SALMON, REACTION NORMS",
author = "Sinclair, {Brent J.} and Marshall, {Katie E.} and Sewell, {Mary A.} and Levesque, {Danielle L.} and Willett, {Christopher S.} and Stine Slotsbo and Yunwei Dong and Harley, {Christopher D. G.} and Marshall, {David J.} and Helmuth, {Brian S.} and Huey, {Raymond B.}",
year = "2016",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1111/ele.12686",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "1372--1385",
journal = "Ecology Letters",
issn = "1461-023X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
number = "11",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can we predict ectotherm responses to climate change using thermal performance curves and body temperatures?

AU - Sinclair, Brent J.

AU - Marshall, Katie E.

AU - Sewell, Mary A.

AU - Levesque, Danielle L.

AU - Willett, Christopher S.

AU - Slotsbo, Stine

AU - Dong, Yunwei

AU - Harley, Christopher D. G.

AU - Marshall, David J.

AU - Helmuth, Brian S.

AU - Huey, Raymond B.

PY - 2016/11

Y1 - 2016/11

N2 - Thermal performance curves (TPCs), which quantify how an ectotherm's body temperature (T-b) affects its performance or fitness, are often used in an attempt to predict organismal responses to climate change. Here, we examine the key - but often biologically unreasonable - assumptions underlying this approach; for example, that physiology and thermal regimes are invariant over ontogeny, space and time, and also that TPCs are independent of previously experienced T-b. We show how a critical consideration of these assumptions can lead to biologically useful hypotheses and experimental designs. For example, rather than assuming that TPCs are fixed during ontogeny, one can measure TPCs for each major life stage and incorporate these into stage-specific ecological models to reveal the life stage most likely to be vulnerable to climate change. Our overall goal is to explicitly examine the assumptions underlying the integration of TPCs with T-b, to develop a framework within which empiricists can place their work within these limitations, and to facilitate the application of thermal physiology to understanding the biological implications of climate change.

AB - Thermal performance curves (TPCs), which quantify how an ectotherm's body temperature (T-b) affects its performance or fitness, are often used in an attempt to predict organismal responses to climate change. Here, we examine the key - but often biologically unreasonable - assumptions underlying this approach; for example, that physiology and thermal regimes are invariant over ontogeny, space and time, and also that TPCs are independent of previously experienced T-b. We show how a critical consideration of these assumptions can lead to biologically useful hypotheses and experimental designs. For example, rather than assuming that TPCs are fixed during ontogeny, one can measure TPCs for each major life stage and incorporate these into stage-specific ecological models to reveal the life stage most likely to be vulnerable to climate change. Our overall goal is to explicitly examine the assumptions underlying the integration of TPCs with T-b, to develop a framework within which empiricists can place their work within these limitations, and to facilitate the application of thermal physiology to understanding the biological implications of climate change.

KW - Body temperature

KW - climate change

KW - fitness

KW - thermal performance

KW - thermal variability

KW - PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE

KW - THERMOREGULATORY BEHAVIOR

KW - TERRESTRIAL ECTOTHERMS

KW - FITNESS CONSEQUENCES

KW - EXTREME TEMPERATURES

KW - JENSENS INEQUALITY

KW - ONCORHYNCHUS-NERKA

KW - HABITAT SELECTION

KW - SOCKEYE-SALMON

KW - REACTION NORMS

U2 - 10.1111/ele.12686

DO - 10.1111/ele.12686

M3 - Review

C2 - 27667778

VL - 19

SP - 1372

EP - 1385

JO - Ecology Letters

JF - Ecology Letters

SN - 1461-023X

IS - 11

ER -